Opinion

The Complex Dance Of Choosing A New Rabbi

07/11/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

My friend Raphael Silver recently completed a novel, “Congregation,” that will be published as an e-book later this year. It centers on a strong, charismatic rabbi of a large Reform congregation in Cleveland, who is diagnosed with ALS and must decide when to retire. Various sub-plots intertwine, one of them about the manipulations of the congregation’s president to have the assistant rabbi replace the senior one when he leaves.

Francine Klagsbrun

Demographics Put Pressure On Communal Groups

07/03/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Jews are more religious, Jews are poorer, Jews are less educated, Jews are less affiliated. 

So tell me something I don’t know.

Jerome A. Chanes

College Dropouts

07/03/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Last month the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism drove the penultimate nail into the coffin of Koach, its college-programming branch, by announcing it would end the program unless supporters raised $130,000 by the end of the year. With such a blatant reluctance to internally sustain Koach, and the near impossibility of supporters raising such a sum, the USCJ message is clear: we are no longer able to support our college students.

Sam Cohen

Lifting Our Heads High As Conservative Jews

06/26/2012
Special To The Jewish Week
It seems that every significant study of the Jewish people is released while we read from the Book of Numbers, the book that derives its English name from the first official census of the Jewish people. It’s as if counting the Jewish people is imbedded in our DNA. That census, conducted 3,000-plus years ago, however, was much more limited in scope: Only men age 20 and older who are able to go to war (Numbers 1:3) were to be counted. From the Torah’s census of 603,550 Israelites of age for war, scholars estimate that the total population was in the 2.5 million range. 
Rabbi Steven Wernick

The OU And UJA: Building On Study’s Findings

06/26/2012
Special To The Jewish Week
In 1945, my grandfather was listed as “Mr. A. — a specimen Orthodox Jew” in Milton Steinberg’s book “A Partisan Guide to the Jewish Problem.” The interview with him is summarized in these words: “The misgiving that haunts him most persistently is over his children. … His great fear is that they will depart from the way he walks, either repudiating his postulates or rebelling against the hardship he gladly endures, or simply refusing to be different from almost everyone else. Against such eventualities he is putting up a game fight.
Rabbi Judah Isaacs

What The Rebbe Taught

06/19/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

At a memorial session at the Israeli Knesset honoring the Lubavitcher Rebbe shortly after his death, Chief Rabbi Yisrael Meir Lau recalled a conversation he had once had with him in which Rabbi Lau spoke of his active involvement in kiruv rechokim, bringing back to Judaism lost Jews who had strayed far away. “The Rebbe immediately corrected me: ‘We cannot label anyone as being ‘far.”  Who are we to determine who is far and who is near? They are all close to Hashem” [God]

Rabbi Joseph Telushkin

Some Takeaways From The Population Survey

06/19/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

We are living in a time when 20th-century Jewish institutions are being challenged by the forces of the 21st century. A speaker at the recent Jewish Futures conference invoked the metaphor of the “brick hitting the cloud.” Participants were implored to smash idols — 20th-century institutions — in the name of reinventing Jewish community. Of course smashing these idols involves dissolution of the “establishment,” including federations.

Alisa Rubin Kurshan

Munich 11 Deserve a Minute

06/13/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Forty years ago, athletes from countries around the world were completing their training, attending good luck send-offs, and packing their gear to depart for the 1972 summer Olympics in Munich.

Rep. Nita Lowey

Kissinger And Human Rights: Why Is Israel Honoring Him?

06/12/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Human rights “are the birthright of all people,” Secretary of State Hillary Clinton declared in a speech before the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva on Dec. 6, 2011. “It does not matter what country we live in, who our leaders are, or even who we are. Because we are human, we therefore have rights. And because we have rights, governments are bound to protect them.”

Poland And The Death Camps: Setting The Record Straight

06/12/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

It should be simple to make the proper distinction: Poland has a long and not distinguished history of anti-Semitism, including before, during, and after World War II. But it was not responsible for the death camps and the Holocaust.

Abraham H. Foxman
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