Gary Rosenblatt

The Gates Are Closing

10/04/2011
Editor And Publisher

The quintessential Jewish joke takes place on the eve of Yom Kippur. The elderly rabbi arrives first at the small synagogue early in the morning, long before services, walks to dark corner of the sanctuary and begins to plead quietly with his Maker.

“Oh Lord, have pity on me, I am like the dust of the earth, a speck in the universe…”

Gary Rosenblatt

Don’t Ignore Our Generational Divide

09/27/2011
Editor And Publisher

What happens when two Jewish imperatives — the tribal instinct to ensure the survival and growth of the Jewish people, and the Torah-based mandate to maintain our highest ethical standards — clash?

I saw those tensions played out last week at The Conversation, the Jewish Week-sponsored, two-day annual conference that brings together a cross-section of 50 American Jews, lay and professional, leaders and emerging leaders representing a wide range of ages, interests, backgrounds and beliefs.

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Fulfilling The Promise

09/20/2011
Editor and Publisher

Walking through the small, neatly kept Congregation Kneseth Israel cemetery in Annapolis, Md., last Friday was, as usual, a bittersweet experience.

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When To Apologize, And When Not To

09/13/2011
Editor And Publisher

Talk of “apology” and “forgiveness” is all around us today, from the international diplomatic front, where Turkey and Egypt have insisted on Israeli apologies for recent actions, to the personal and communal level, where our thoughts turn to the approaching High Holy Days and the central theme of atoning for our sins.

We are taught to seek forgiveness when we have done wrong, but is it appropriate to apologize for an act that we believe merits no admission of guilt?

Gary Rosenblatt

A Decade Later, 9/11 Struggle Continues

09/06/2011
Editor And Publisher

Sept. 11, 2001 was a Tuesday, deadline day for The Jewish Week.

As the horrific events began to unfold that morning, I found myself consumed, at times, by the unfolding coverage on television, then forcing myself away from it, trying to focus on getting the issue out on time. In revising the paper’s contents and helping to assign fresh staff coverage, I was very much aware that we were experiencing a moment when one could feel our nation’s history veering off into an unknown, dangerous path. One from which we haven’t really recovered, and perhaps never will.

Gary Rosenblatt

Waiting For The Power To Come Back

08/30/2011
Editor And Publisher

When the power went out in our house Sunday afternoon, I was able to e-mail a friend and neighbor (thanks to my trusty BlackBerry) to ask if he’d lost power, too. He wrote back to say yes, adding: “But Jews were powerless for 2,000 years, and we’re still here.”

Gary Rosenblatt

The Weekly Column, Shooting For 1,000

08/16/2011
Editor And Publisher

A few summers back, while talking to my Mom on a Saturday night, I mentioned that my wife and I were packing for our vacation the next day but that I still hadn’t written my Jewish Week column for the upcoming issue and was feeling the pressure.

“Why don’t you skip a week,” said my Mom, who has since passed away. “Make ‘em miss you.”

After some initial resistance, I took her suggestion.

Gary Rosenblatt

Looking Back, From Addis Ababa To Crown Heights

08/09/2011
Editor And Publisher

Two very different landmark events in black-Jewish relations took place in 1991, one tragic and one thrilling. Twenty years later, the repercussions are still being felt.

On Aug. 19, 1991, a car accident in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn launched a perfect storm of violence, transforming a longstanding resentment among some blacks of Jews in general and neighborhood chasidim in particular into three days of rage and riots that some historians have called the worst case of anti-Semitism in American history.

Gary Rosenblatt

Is It ‘Anti-Orthodox’ To Seek A Safer Community?

08/02/2011
Editor And Publisher

It is sad, if not maddening, when this newspaper is labeled “anti-Orthodox” for its reporting on scandals and other disturbing incidents in a segment of the community whose culture places a high value on policing itself.

Gary Rosenblatt

When Promises Were Sacred, Not Empty

07/26/2011
Editor And Publisher

Reading news reports this summer about the breakdown of talks, and trust, between our nation’s leaders over the debt ceiling has been deeply depressing but not surprising.

It’s just one example, however dramatic, of the chasm between public pledges made and kept.

We have become so used to government officials in Jerusalem as well as Washington making empty promises that we no longer register shock or disappointment when their actions contradict their previous assurances, where “word of honor” has no meaning.

Gary Rosenblatt
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