Political Insider

A look behind the scenes in the political world

Netanyahu and the 'self hating Jews' in Washington

You have to wonder about some of the members of Bibi Netanyahu’s government.

John Ensign's 'family values'

So Sen. John Ensign’s (R-Nev.) parents paid some  $96,000 to his mistress (see this Washington Post story).

It sure is nice to see family members helping each other out in times of crisis.

The Democrats not-so-super Senate majority

If I was Rabbi David Saperstein (and that's not likely; who has that much energy?), I'd be pleased as punch that Al Franken now has “Sen.” and “D-Minn.)  stuck on his name.  But I wouldn't be popping any champagne corks; the 60 vote super majority the Democrats gained in theory when Franken was finally sworn in this week will  be hard to mobilize in practice.

Obama administration a disappointment to military church-state leader

The leading activist in the fight to make the U.S. military live up to constitutional  church-state protections is glad the Pentagon has decided not to allow an Air Force “flyover” as part  the annual God and Country Festival in Nampa, Idaho – the first time military authorities have denied the sponsoring group’s request  in 42 years.

The Palin Factor and the Jews

The Sarah Palin political soap opera took its strangest twist on Friday when the 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee and possible 2012 presidential contender announced she was resigning as Alaska's governor before the end of her first term. What's the likely impact on Jewish politics?  It's hard to tell, although that won't stop wild speculation in political circles.

Minnesota Supremes Rule: Franken wins, Coleman's toast

A Caption Can Be ENtered Upon Selection of an ImageEight months after Minnesota voters went to the polls, the state is about to get a new senator. And it’s not the old one – Norm Coleman, the Republican whose last appeal of the razor-thin election was rejected by the Minnesota Supreme Court on Tuesday in a unanimous decision.

A lower court ruled that Democrat Al Franken, the former Saturday Night Live comic, won the election by 312 votes, but Coleman continued to argue that an additional 4000 absentee ballots should be counted.

Jewish Dems gloating: No Jewish Republicans in the Senate.

In the old-news-presented-as-new department, the National Jewish Democratic Council (NJDC) is beside itself with joy because now, officially, there isn’t a single Jewish Republican in the Senate – the first time, the group notes, since 1957, when New York’s Jacob Javits was sworn in (read the group’s blog post here),

Did we learn the right lessons from the Madoff ripoff?

Did we learn the real lessons of the Madoff ripoff? So Ponzi king Bernie Madoff has been sentenced to 150 years, and the blogosphere is aflame with the outrage and anguish of the victims of this record-breaking swindler. While significant recovery seems unlikely for most, there’s a degree of satisfaction that he didn’t get away with the usual wrist-slapping white collar sentence. But to me some of the case’s most important questions remain unanswered.

Minnesota Supreme Court rules, Coleman’s toast, Franken to be seated

Tuesday, June 30th, 2009 Eight months after Minnesota voters went to the polls, the state is about to get a new senator. And it’s not the old one – Norm Coleman, the Republican whose last appeal of the razor-thin election was rejected by the Minnesota Supreme Court on Tuesday in a unanimous decision. A lower court ruled that Democrat Al Franken, the former Saturday Night Live comic, won the election by 312 votes, but Coleman continued to argue that an additional 4000 absentee ballots should be counted.

Did we learn the real lessons of the Madoff ripoff?

Tuesday, June 30th, 2009 So Ponzi king Bernie Madoff has been sentenced to 150 years, and the blogosphere is aflame with the outrage and anguish of the victims of this record-breaking swindler. While significant recovery seems unlikely for most, there’s a degree of satisfaction that he didn’t get away with the usual wrist-slapping white collar sentence. But to me some of the case’s most important questions remain unanswered.
Syndicate content