Short Takes

Zayds Goes To Germany

03/16/2007
Staff Writer
Visitors to a new Jewish museum, which opens Thursday in the heart of Munich, will be able to learn on four exhibition floors about Jewish life and culture in Germany’s Bavaria region. And at the entrance to the building they will learn a bit about a Jewish family from Manhattan’s Upper West Side. Ten original cartoons from “Everything’s Relative,” a decade-old comic strip that appears in this newspaper and a handful of other Jewish papers in the U.S., will be posted as silk screens on the walls at the front door.

Close-Knit Philanthropy

03/09/2007
Staff Writer
When Fern Penn visits Israel on product-finding missions for Rosebud, her Israel concept and fashion boutique in Soho, she always brings presents for the Israeli designers with whom she does business. Last month, while in Tel Aviv for a designer showcase, Penn presented jewelry designer Vered Laor with a multicolored fuzzy scarf that she had knitted herself. From that scarf a fundraiser was born.

‘Titanic’ Claim About Jesus

03/02/2007
Staff Writer
Holy ground or wholly bunk? Israeli archaeologists excavated a burial tomb’s entrance, above, in the Jerusalem neighborhood of East Talpiot in 1980. Inside they discovered 10 limestone ossuaries, or small burial boxes, including one first-century box, inset. Filmmaker James Cameron, right, says the ossuary is where Jesus is buried. Cameron is producer of “The Lost Tomb of Jesus,” a documentary about the site that premieres next week on the Discovery Channel.

AJCongress Leader Maslow, 99

03/02/2007
Staff Writer
(JTA) — Former American Jewish Congress leader William Maslow died in his Manhattan home last Friday at the age of 99. Born in Kiev in 1907, Maslow moved to the United States with his family in 1911. He served as general counsel to the AJCongress from 1945 to 1960, and as executive director from 1960 to 1972, guiding the organization’s fight against discrimination to the court system. Under Maslow’s direction, the AJCongress fought housing restrictions on Jews in many communities, as well as discriminatory hiring and admissions policies at U.S. companies and universities.

RIETS’ Rabbi Elimelech Schachter, 93

03/02/2007
Staff Writer
Rabbi Elimelech Schachter, a faculty member at the Yeshiva University rabbinical school for nearly 50 years, died Feb. 26 in Borough Park. He was 93. Rabbi Schachter served as professor of rabbinics at the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary and taught at many divisions of YU, mentoring generations of rabbinical students. He was the author of “The Babylonian and Jerusalem Mishnah and wrote several rabbinic opinions and scholarly articles.

Mezuzah Standoff In Ft. Lauderdale

02/16/2007
Staff Writer
A mezuzah placed on the door of a condo in South Florida, of all places, is stirring a controversy. Laurie Richter, a recent law school graduate, attached the mezuzah to the doorpost of her condo apartment in Fort Lauderdale when she moved in on Dec. 1, and the condo board told her recently to take it down. The Port condominium told Richter that the mezuzah violates bylaws that prohibit owners and occupants from attaching, hanging, affixing or displaying anything on the building’s walls, doors, balconies, railings and windows.

Hizzoner Visits Israel

02/09/2007
Staff Writer
New York City’s mayor combined the personal and the political during his latest visit to Israel. During two days there last week, he took part in the dedication of a refurbished emergency rescue service center in Jerusalem, and spent a morning in a Negev city that has been the target of repeated rocket attacks from Gaza.

Going The Distance For Israel

10/29/2004
Staff Writer
In Rabbi Eric Ertel’s pursuit to help Israel, it was P. Diddy who jogged his mind on how he should do it. The rabbi, educational director at Aish NY, wasn’t quite sure how to get started in his efforts to assist the country he had lived and studied in for several years. Then he read about the rap star running the New York City Marathon last year to raise money for local educational programs.

Guinness Entry Meets School’s Kneads

10/01/2004
Staff Writer
Finally, a fund-raising idea that’s not half-baked. Students from a small day school in western Massachusetts this week made a challah that will go on display at an agricultural festival, then enter the Guinness Book of World Records. The “Challah of Fame” is 40 feet long and weighs 120 pounds.

A Long Wait For A Flight

09/24/2004
Staff Writer
Israel’s day of rest came four days early this year. The country’s 400,000 public sector workers, including employees of religious councils, went on strike to protest delayed payment of wages. The nationwide strike was called on Tuesday, four days before Yom Kippur. The third strike called by the Histadrut labor federation in the last year, it shut down government offices and hospitals, the stock exchange and banks, railways and sea ports, ambulance services and fire departments, mail delivery and utilities.
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