Sacred and Insane

Sacred and Insane: An Aliyah Journal

Finally, some sun.

I know it's pretty sacrilege to think this way in Israel – but enough with the rain already. The downpours, the muddy puddles, the sidewalk slip-and-slides. I'm so happy to see some sun today (though I probably should take a break from working and leave my apartment to enjoy it).

A rare sewer, found on Yaffo Street

Week’s end absurdities – 1/28

 I’ve decided that on every Friday morning from now on I will publish a brief list of some of the most ridiculous things I’ve seen, heard or smelled over the past week. Things that don’t warrant an entire post but encapsulate the eccentric world that is Israeli society.

Ulpan Obama-sha

 My friend and former ulpan desk partner Ben decided to initiate a game of ulpan "bingo" about a month and a half ago, in which each tile represents a different ridiculous phenomenon that could take place only within the steamy – and I mean steamy; the heat is always on full blast – confines of our unique Ulpan Morasha classroom.

One of the squares contained an item that comes up daily, without fail, the mention of US President Barack Obama in negative connotation during a sample sentence used to practice Hebrew.

Week’s end absurdities – 1/21

I’ve decided that on every Friday morning from now on I will publish a brief list of some of the most ridiculous things I’ve seen, heard or smelled over the past week. Things that don’t warrant an entire post but encapsulate the eccentric world that is Israeli society.

-Monday: an Israeli girl was sporting full-on dreadlocks on the morning bus ride. What's worse – this, or the 'Crocs and socks' phenomenon? Come on, you're an Ashkenazi Jewish girl...

How to survive J'lem's newest traffic

It's good to see that some people still have a sense of humor.

As of Saturday night, as all Jerusalemites are angrily aware, the cities buses were all rerouted from Jaffa Road – where light rail tests are now under way – to the parallel Agripas and Haneviim streets, which were already entirely clogged with traffic.

Week’s end absurdities – 1/14

I've decided that on every Friday morning from now on I will publish a brief list of some of the most ridiculous things I've seen, heard or smelled over the past week. Things that don't warrant an entire post but encapsulate the eccentric world that is Israeli society.

I apologize for the lack of real post for the past few days, but I've been rather sick (and still am) with some strange Israeli virus presumably.

Mucinex guy from American TV commercials

Week's end absurdities – 1/7

I've decided that on every Friday morning from now on I will publish a brief list of some of the most ridiculous things I've seen, heard or smelled over the past week. Things that don't warrant an entire post but encapsulate the eccentric world that is Israeli society.

'Crocs and socks' that I spotted on the bus Monday afternoon.

Turning 26 and marking 4 months in Israel

Saturday marked the end of the 26th year of my life – or, rather, my 26th birthday – as well as the conclusion of my fourth month as an Israeli citizen.

While there have certainly been many inconveniences and difficulties, looking back at my past four months I have to say that I am lucky to have been having an overwhelmingly positive experience here. A lot of credit goes to the wonderful friends and boyfriend whom I have here, my surprising ability to continue as a journalist in this country and of course, the huge support of my amazing friends and family back home. And nothing can top off a 26th birthday like a dinner at Sushi Rehavia on Azza Street, even if your New York sushi pals are sadly missing.

Throwing punches, or not really

Wednesday morning was a bureaucratic balagan of balagans.

Apparently, it's that time of year where Jerusalemites have to pay "arnona," which is basically a municipal tax on your apartment that each roommate or family must pay – even as renters. But as a new immigrant to israel, however, I am luckily entitled to a 90 percent discount on my portion of the arnona, meaning – you guessed it – I had to head down to yet another government building this morning, just after I had put my mom onto a Nesher airport shuttle that would take her home.

Because who can live without a Slurpee?

One thing glaringly missing from my life in Israel was the infallibly refreshing slush of the universally pleasing product – the Slurpee.

Here during the summer, for instance, I lamented the day of July 11 (7-11), where I had normally been accustomed to visiting multiple 7-11 locations to maximize my acquisition of free 7.11-oz. Slurpees that I could collect that day.

But my problems have been solved. As I first learned in a short piece on Ynet a few weeks ago and then in a lengthier Jerusalem Post story that I edited last week, one innovative immigrant to Israel decided to remedy this dry spell through his son’s inspiration.

Holy Bagel on Rehov Yafo - the Freezee machine is to the right of the door, if you can see it
Syndicate content