Israel News

Midnight At The Oasis Palestinians leave politics at the door.

10/09/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jericho, West Bank — It’s always been a gamble for Israeli Jews to travel into the West Bank. Now there may be a payoff. While many Israelis are making pilgrimages to the Tomb of the Patriarchs in Hebron this holiday season, many others are traveling the winding roads of the West Bank to visit the region’s newest casino.

Israel Journal: Language Barrier

10/02/1998
Israel Correspondent

Misgav, Galilee — It is the second week of first grade, and 6-year-old Faidi Mohammed looks as if he’d like to be anywhere but this classroom, listening to a teacher describe in Hebrew the Jewish holiday of Rosh HaShanah.

Like most of the 32 children enrolled in Israel’s first fully accredited bilingual school, Faidi, a dark-haired boy with an engaging smile, is in the grips of culture shock.

Bibi: Still Committed To Oslo

09/18/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said on Monday that Israel has no choice but to adhere to the Oslo peace accord, despite the fact that he considers it a “flawed deal.” Speaking to a group of journalists representing Jewish newspapers, Netanyahu said that Israel is committed to carrying out a second redeployment under the treaty’s interim stage. To do otherwise, he said, could jeopardize the country’s international treaties with other nations.

Making A Push For Personal Freedom

07/17/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — During Passover week, Amira Segev decided to buy a pack of chewing gum at a local supermarket. When she arrived at the cash register, however, the cashier refused to ring up the purchase.

“I can’t sell this to you because it’s not kosher for Passover,” the young cashier told Segev apologetically. “The law says we can only sell Passover food during Passover.”

Shidduch Chic

06/19/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — Suddenly, it’s hip to be square in the Holy Land. Since the beginning of the year in Old Katamon, a historic, tree-lined neighborhood here, at least two dozen singles in their 30s and 40s have announced their engagements.

Although there is nothing unusual about Israelis getting hitched (by the age of 40 more than 90 percent have been married at least once), many, perhaps most of the above-mentioned brides and grooms met their soulmates through a professional or amateur matchmaker.

From Yeshiva To Army?

05/29/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — Shimon, a student at the ultra-Orthodox Tiferet Israel yeshiva, says he is not prepared to serve in the military, even if a new bill calling on the draft of yeshiva students is passed in the Knesset.

“I won’t go into the army, even if there is a law,” says the army-age yeshiva bocher, who studies at the school from early in the morning until late at night.

A Jarring Jubilee

05/08/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — The schism between religious and secular Israelis has never been wider, the rate of unemployment is soaring and the peace process is nearly on life support.

So what prompted Ziva Moshe, a 44-year-old mother of four, to celebrate Israel’s 50th anniversary with unabashed pride and a traditional barbecue?

“It’s a holiday, a beautiful sunny day and I’m happy,” said Moshe, who like hundreds of thousands of other Israelis congregated in the nation’s parks on Israeli Independence Day.

In Limbo On The West Bank

05/01/1998
Israel Correspondent

Ramallah, West Bank — Walking through the sunny, well-kept streets of Deir Debwan, a half-hour outside Jerusalem, it is easy to see why this tony Arab enclave has been dubbed the Beverly Hills of the West Bank.

Thanks to the success of its far-flung sons and daughters, multi-level homes abound. Some have indoor swimming pools. And at one time or another, nearly half the town’s 8,000 residents have lived in the United States.

Vallone Braves Hebron

04/24/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — While British Prime Minister Tony Blair practically did cartwheels to avoid courting controversy during his visit to Israel this week, New York City Council Speaker Peter Vallone, also on a whirlwind tour, took no such precautions.

Mission Of The Young

05/07/1999
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — For the first time in her life, Efrat, a 19-year-old yeshiva student, will be voting in Israel’s national elections. Seated around a table with girlfriends in the food court of a downtown shopping mall, the soft-spoken teenager lists the issues most important to her.

“There needs to be more unity among all the people. Right now, there’s a distance between us. We need to be one nation, one people,” she says.

Syndicate content