New York

Jewish Memory And The Press

11/19/1999
Staff Writer

God may be invisible but his fingerprints are all over the news, particularly all over the old Berlin Wall. Like the Ninth of Av, which commemorates a chain of sadness, all linked, from the desert Jews to Roman times, the Ninth of November, when the Wall fell, is accumulating a mighty share of coincidence all its own.

Papering Over Hot-Button Issues

04/29/2005
Editor & Publisher
Twenty years after Irving “Yitz” Greenberg, a prominent American rabbi, predicted that the growing ideological rift among traditional and liberal Jewish movements would cause an irrevocable split in religious life, the denominational wars have subsided.

Papering Over Hot-Button Issues

04/29/2005
Editor & Publisher
Twenty years after Irving “Yitz” Greenberg, a prominent American rabbi, predicted that the growing ideological rift among traditional and liberal Jewish movements would cause an irrevocable split in religious life, the denominational wars have subsided.But in a new report commissioned by the American Jewish Committee, to be released next week at the group’s annual meeting in Washington, an expert warns that key religious issues have been papered over rather than resolved — and just under the surface remain certain to flare up anew.

Spitzer Set To Urge WJC Reforms

06/10/2005
Editor & Publisher
In late February, Joel Sprayregen, a national Jewish lay leader, briefly met New York State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer at an American Jewish Committee dinner in Chicago. Sprayregen, a Chicago attorney and honorary national vice chairman of the Anti-Defamation League, recalled that when he told Spitzer he was glad to have learned that the attorney general’s office was investigating the World Jewish Congress, “the attorney general replied, in effect, that to call it an investigation would be an overstatement.”

Did Musharraf

09/23/2005
Editor & Publisher
Did Gen.

Devastated But Together

09/11/1998
Staff Writer
Renewal, a theme of the High Holy Days, will resonate in particular this year for the congregants of Manhattan’s Central Synagogue, which was heavily damaged last month by fire. “I’m going to speak about the lessons one unfortunately takes from a trauma like this,” said Rabbi Peter Rubinstein, the congregation’s spiritual leader. “I’m going to talk of the vision of rebuilding, something that unfortunately Jews are accustomed to doing. And I’m going to say that just as buildings can be rebuilt, so can lives.”

‘Jewish Unity At Its Finest’

08/28/1998
Staff Writer
After a rocky first year, the much-heralded UJA-Federation Unity Campaign designed to help the Conservative, Orthodox and Reform movements raise money for their own projects in Israel has raised nearly $10.5 million in pledges and organizers said they have begun to pull their act together. This effort comes at a time of a booming economy that has helped 36 federations across the country achieve record high levels of donations.

Commitment To The Poor

08/07/1998
Staff Writer
Just months after Susan M. of the Bronx underwent triple bypass surgery following a heart attack, she was threatened with eviction and a cutoff of her phone, gas and electric service. “I didn’t know where to turn,” said the 58-year-old widow. Susan, whose husband died of cancer 20 years ago, leaving her with two small children and no life insurance, said she was physically unable to return to her secretarial job and had no savings.

A Dose Of Humanity

07/24/1998
Staff Writer
Zionism and the need to remedy a nursing shortage are working hand-in-hand in southern Israel. For the past eight years, the head nurse of the Soroka University Medical Center in Beersheva, Masha Hechtlinger, has been traveling as often as five times a year to the former Soviet Union to interview and recruit potential Jewish nurses. She goes armed with the promise of financial support, while the nurses learn Hebrew and prepare to take Israel’s rigorous test to become registered nurses. And she holds out the prospect of employment at Soroka for those who pass the exam.

ACLU Bias Suit Against YU Assailed

Yeshiva University justified in barring gay couples from student housing, proclaim Orthodox Jewish group and AJCongress.

07/03/1998
Staff Writer
For supporters of two lesbians at Yeshiva University’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York law is clear-cut: the school may not discriminate against them in housing. But two Jewish groups are not so sure, and two others have weighed in on the side of the school. At the heart of the issue is the college’s policy of restricting its graduate housing to students only — except in the case of married students, who are given priority for studio apartments.
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