New York

Oldest (Local) Maccabiah Athlete Tells All

07/07/2005 - 20:00
Staff Writer
A friend of Charles Coates at the University of Illinois had some interesting news in early 1935. "Chuck, they're having a track meet in Palestine," Coates' buddy said. Coates, a sprinter since his elementary school and high school days in New York City, hadn't heard of the second Maccabiah Games. But an all-expenses-paid trip overseas sounded exciting.

A Tall Tale Of Love

07/07/2005 - 20:00
Staff Writer
Audrey and Bruce Carlson of Newington, Conn., traveled to Chile at the end of 2003 to watch some basketball. Their daughter, Leslie, was a member of the U.S. open women's basketball team in the 10th Pan American Maccabi Games. Leslie's parents also went as scouts. "They came to Chile to find me a Jewish husband," she said. Leslie didn't need their help. A resident of the Upper East Side and a graduate of George Washington University, which she attended on a basketball scholarship, Leslie is returning to Maccabi competition next week.

In The Bat Mitzvah Spirit

06/16/2005 - 20:00
Staff Writer
Among the concerns for the Lippmans of the Upper East Side in planning their daughter Juliet's bat mitzvah last fall was how to give the occasion some spiritual significance. "What should we do so it's not just a party?" Marie Lippman asked a friend, Rabbi Adina Lewittes of Tenafly, N.J., over lunch at a Midtown restaurant a few months before the bat mitzvah. Rabbi Lewittes answered by telling a story she had just read in Rabbi Daniel Gordis' on-line column from Israel.

Happy Campers, Unhappy Memories

08/13/2009 - 20:00
Staff Writer
Evyatar, a kindergarten student in Israel 13 years ago, sensed that something was wrong when neither of his parents picked him up from school. An uncle showed up a few hours later and told his nephew what had happened – Evyatar’s parents had been attacked by terrorists at an Israeli toy store; his father was dead, his mother injured.

Happy Campers, Unhappy Memories

08/13/2009 - 20:00
Staff Writer
Evyatar, a kindergarten student in Israel 13 years ago, sensed that something was wrong when neither of his parents picked him up from school. An uncle showed up a few hours later and told his nephew what had happened – Evyatar’s parents had been attacked by terrorists at an Israeli toy store; his father was dead, his mother injured.

In The Bat Mitzvah Spirit

06/16/2005 - 20:00
Staff Writer
Among the concerns for the Lippmans of the Upper East Side in planning their daughter Juliet's bat mitzvah last fall was how to give the occasion some spiritual significance. "What should we do so it's not just a party?" Marie Lippman asked a friend, Rabbi Adina Lewittes of Tenafly, N.J., over lunch at a Midtown restaurant a few months before the bat mitzvah. Rabbi Lewittes answered by telling a story she had just read in Rabbi Daniel Gordis' on-line column from Israel.

(Gen) X Plus Y Equals 10 (Commandments)

06/09/2005 - 20:00
Staff Writer
This was Ruth Calderon's Shavuot experience as a child in Tel Aviv: She bought cheese for her family's cheesecake, shopped for fruits for an elementary school agricultural presentation and picked out a new white blouse to wear. Her family and her school were secular. Calderon never learned the spiritual significance of Shavuot, which commemorates the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai. "Shavuot as a holiday faded for us," she says.

List Of Candidates

04/07/2005 - 20:00
Staff Writer
Following the 26-year papacy of the Church's first Polish pope, who made historic overtures to the Jewish community, the identity and background of the next pope is of particular interest to Jews. Will the 265th pope continue the pro-Jewish policies of John Paul II, reverse them, or concentrate on other theological and political areas?

Southern Comfort

06/06/2002 - 20:00
Staff Writer
Rabbi Rafael Grossman, for nearly three decades the spiritual leader of the largest Orthodox congregation in the United States, left his Southern synagogue recently for a small, struggling synagogue here because of one five-year-old boy. His grandson. Rabbi Grossman, visiting his son's home in Teaneck, N.J., last year, heard his grandson say, "I think I know who you are." The rabbi was stunned. Bi-monthly visits to his children in the areas of Boston and New York would no longer be enough. The grandchildren had to know bubbe and zaide.

Healing The Spirit

12/05/2002 - 19:00
Staff Writer
Tamara Green entered the world of chronic illness, unexpectedly, one morning 35 years ago. "I woke up feeling like I'd been pushed down a flight of stairs," she says. "Every part of me was charley-horsed. I was nauseous." Years of misdiagnoses (she has a severe disease of the connective tissue, like the one that afflicted the late Norman Cousins) were followed by decades of treatment (drugs, crutches, feeding tubes, physical therapy).
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