New York

Israel Tries Carrot And Stick On Violence

05/04/2001
Staff Writer
As Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres spoke here this week of a cease-fire plan that would lead to a resumption of peace talks, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon ordered troops into another Palestinian refugee camp to destroy homes and huts used as cover to shoot at Israelis. “There are differences of style and nuance,” Dore Gold, a senior aide to Sharon, explained of the Peres-Sharon approaches, “but the substance is the same.”

Three Teens Nabbed In Synagogue Fire

05/04/2001
Staff Writer
Authorities say it was vandalism and not anti-Semitism that led three teens to allegedly set fire to the permanent walls of a sukkah in the rear of a Washington Heights synagogue, but the congregation’s president would like to hear an apology from the youths. “I don’t know how to read the motivation of these boys,” said Erich Erlbach of Congregation K’hal Adath Jeshurun, at 85-93 Bennett Ave., which is also known as the Breuer Shul. “People were concerned. Many feel it’s a bias crime, others don’t.”

Friday The Rabbi Stayed Home

05/21/2004
Staff Writer
On the evening of May 6, Rabbi Adam Mintz was installed at his congregation, Lincoln Square Synagogue in Manhattan, as the new president of the New York Board of Rabbis. An articulate spokesman for Modern Orthodoxy in his 40s, Rabbi Mintz is said to be respected by colleagues in all the denominations that comprise the board. But last Shabbat, the rabbi was nowhere to be seen at Lincoln Square, a leading Orthodox congregation in the city.

The Face Of N.Y. Jewry

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
In 1991, there were 1.42 million Jews in the city, Long Island and Westchester. How many there are today? Where are they concentrated? What is their attitude toward Israel?Are Holocaust survivors more or less likely to be poor than other Jews in the city? UJA-Federation of New York will learn the answers to these and other questions beginning this week as it launches a telephone survey that will seek to conduct in-depth interviews with members of 4,000 Jewish households.

To Your Health

12/04/1998
Staff Writer
After being told in a phone call from her surgeon that she again had breast cancer and that it had spread to her lymph nodes, Judy Lazar of Manhasset became hysterical. “I was angry and petrified. And I was scared,” she recalls. “I kept saying, ‘I’m not having chemotherapy.’ My husband, Joel, who is terrific, didn’t know what to do with me.” So he called the home of the family’s rabbi, Abner Bergman of Temple Judea of Manhasset. The rabbi’s wife tracked him down at a meeting.

UJC To Take Up Big-Money Chase

10/15/1999
Staff Writer
At a time when private Jewish foundations are doling out perhaps more money on their own than the entire Jewish federation network in North America, the Jewish community is set to strike back. Perhaps the most innovative aspect of the United Jewish Communities’ announcement last week, overshadowed by the appointment of Stephen Solender as president of the newly reorganized social service network, was the establishment of a national foundation to bring America’s most wealthy into the communal tent.

Solender, Ruskay Get Top Spots

10/08/1999
Staff Writer
After an expensive, national six-month search, leaders of the United Jewish Communities, American Jewry’s newly reorganized social service and fund-raising organization, discovered what Dorothy learned years ago in “The Wizard of Oz”: There’s no place like home. The organization announced on Tuesday that Stephen Solender, 61, executive vice president of UJA-Federation of New York for the past 13 years and acting president of the UJC for the past six months, had been named president.

Gastronomic Growth

10/08/1999
Staff Writer
At the same time the kosher food industry is experiencing record growth, the Orthodox Union’s kashrut division has undergone a major transformation as it keeps up with the burgeoning demand of companies seeking the organization’s well-known OU endorsement.

Capital Ideas

10/01/1999
Staff Writer
A $35,000 UJA-Federation grant will help start a Hillel program this semester for an estimated 5,000 New York-area students attending Albany colleges. In announcing the grant, officials said UJA-Federation was recognizing the importance of college years for Jewish identity development — even if it means reaching beyond its geographic boundaries.

The Ties That Bind

10/22/1999
Staff Writer
Three years ago, the leadership of a Modern Orthodox synagogue in Westchester began looking for help in developing a strategic plan to help them better meet the needs of their members. Then someone mentioned UJA-Federation’s management assistance program (MAP). “It was one of the best things we ever did,” Colin Goldberg, president of The Hebrew Institute of White Plains, said of the 11-month program in which congregational leaders participated with leaders of seven other synagogues of every denomination.
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