New York

Web Of Roots

08/12/1999 - 20:00
Staff Writer
Afew dozen people showed up when Bruce Kahn gave his first speech on on-line Jewish genealogical research in 1993. The setting was the annual Conference on Jewish Genealogy, sponsored by the Jewish Genealogical Society (JGS). Kahn, then a research scientist at Eastman Kodak in Rochester, N.Y., and a founder of the city's JGS branch, predicted that the Internet would revolutionize genealogical research. "People thought I was crazy," he says.

Brighton Beach Memories

08/12/1999 - 20:00
Staff Writer
It's a thank you that has lasted 55 years. In 1944, the Niedziolka family, Catholics, who lived on a small farm in eastern Poland, took in four members of the Charatan family and two other escapees from a nearby concentration camp, all Jews. For 14 months, until the Russian Army came, the Niedziolkas fed the six and protected them in a hidden bunker under a barn.

Rabbi David Seligson, 92

08/12/1999 - 20:00
Staff Writer
Rabbi David Seligson, former spiritual leader of Central Synagogue in Manhattan and a leading figure in the Reform rabbinate, died this week in Manhattan. He was 92 and lived the last two years at the Jewish Home and Hospital in Manhattan. Rabbi Seligson served at Central Synagogue for 25 years, becoming rabbi emeritus upon his retirement in 1972. After serving as an Army chaplain during World War II, he joined Central Synagogue in 1945. He became senior rabbi in 1950.

Going The Distance

07/01/1999 - 20:00
Staff Writer
Jaclyn Murphy's dream arrived in a large cardboard box the other day. Enclosed were two plastic caps, some T-shirts and a red, white and blue sweat suit: her uniform for the 1999 Pan American Maccabi Games. The package came about a year after Murphy, 16, a senior at John F. Kennedy High School in Bellmore, L.I., was declared free of cancer.

Sanford Bernstein's Second Life

01/14/1999 - 19:00
Staff Writer
Zalman Bernstein did not make the front page of The Jerusalem Post until he died. Mr. Bernstein, a successful Manhattan investment broker and one of the Modern Orthodox movement's most prominent philanthropists, kept as low a profile in Jewish circles in his native New York, where he died of lymphoma last week at 72, as he did in Jerusalem, where he moved a decade ago and was buried.

'All I Did Was Help'

12/31/1998 - 19:00
Staff Writer
A Ukrainian Bible and a bag of mushrooms. Those were the most precious items Julian Bilecki packed for his Lot Polish Airlines flight to New York last week, for a reunion with some of the 23 Jews he and his family saved from the Nazis in 1943. The Bible is for Bilecki. An evangelical Christian, he prays from it each morning.

Helping Synagogues Meet Members’ Needs

05/13/2008 - 20:00
Staff Writer
Rabbi Gideon Shloush, the spiritual leader for a dozen years of Congregation Adereth El in Manhattan’s Murray Hill neighborhood, said an all-day conference he attended this week inspired him to change his reading habits. He’ll read a printout of his synagogue’s membership list today.

Intifada Spurs Increased Giving

10/30/2003 - 19:00
Staff Writer
Four months before Hadassah was to kick off a major fund-raising campaign for an emergency medical center in Jerusalem, at the beginning of 2002, 9-11 happened. The American economy crashed. Americans donated their shrinking amount of charity dollars to the terrorist attack's relief effort. "We were scared to death," says Joyce Rabin, Hadassah's coordinator of development. Maybe the drive for the new hospital would fail.

A Place To Mourn

06/15/2006 - 20:00
Staff Writer
My greatest lesson about graves came in an unlikely place: an airplane terminal. In 1981 I traveled to Israel to cover, among many assignments, the World Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors, a once-in-a-lifetime conference/reunion/symposium based at Jerusalem's International Convention Center.

New Life For Ancient Pilgrimage

05/18/2006 - 20:00
Staff Writer
In Arabic, the name al ghriba means the strange one or the marvelous one, but the Al Ghriba Synagogue meant death for 21 people four years ago. The synagogue on Djerba, a southern Tunisian island, was the site of an al Qaeda terrorist attack in April 2002, and Jewish pilgrims who had come for centuries for a two-day Lag B'Omer celebration stopped coming. Tuesday was Lag B'Omer, and the pilgrims came back.
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