New York

Sephardic Power Drive

05/08/1998
Staff Writer
The race to fill a vacant Assembly seat this September has produced a rift between a powerful Brooklyn Democratic club and a Sephardic political action committee it helped form. Egyptian-born Lena Cymbrowitz, who is seeking the seat now held by congressional candidate Dan Feldman, is expected to be backed by the recently founded, grassroots Sephardic Voters League.

Aftermath Of The Cato Visit

05/01/1998
Staff Writer
Critics may dismiss last week’s meeting between a small group of Jewish leaders and Carmel Cato as a “good photo op,” but Howard Teich, who facilitated the meeting, insists that was the last thing on his mind.

Ari, Alisa And Memories In The Morning

04/14/2006
Associate Editor

Families of murdered children learn that the pain keeps coming, sneaking up like the killer did in the first place. In 1994, three weeks before Passover, Ari Halberstam, 16, was riding in a van over the Brooklyn Bridge when Rashid Baz, in a nearby car, shot a bullet into Halberstamís brain. Now his mother, Devorah Halberstam, is living, as the holiday prayer surrealistically puts it, ìin those days in this time.î She hangs up her cell phone in tears after another son, 15, calls from a departing plane at Kennedy Airport.ì

Mixed Messages On Blacks And Jews

05/01/1998
Staff Writer
A majority of blacks agree with Jews that anti-Semitism is a problem in the African-American community, according to a national poll released this week. But in a seemingly contradictory finding, 48.8 percent of blacks gave a “favorable” rating to Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, who has a long history of comments and theories considered by Jewish leaders to be anti-Semitic. The poll, commissioned by the New York-based Foundation for Ethnic Understanding, contains several mixed messages about the often polarized groups.

A Fiery Exodus

04/21/2006
Associate Editor

The night before Passover, the Waintraub family checked into the Villa Roma hotel and, with candlelight and a feather, symbolically searched their darkened room for chametz. But not all flames in the hotel were as quaint.

Even as the Waintraubs were searching, shortly after 10 p.m., over in the bakery within the hotel kitchen a fire of unknown origins had begun devouring the 62-year-old resort, one of Sullivan Countyís few remaining grand hotels, where some 500 guests were expected to arrive by the next nightís seder.

Deja Vu In Harlem?

04/24/1998
Staff Writer
The image of a Jewish-owned store burning in Harlem may have conjured up painful memories this week, but community leaders are taking a wait-and-see attitude. “To the best of our knowledge, there was no anti-Semitism involved in this incident,” said Michael Miller of the Jewish Community Relations Council.Police are searching for a black man they say threatened to blow up Vets Sports Shops on 125th Street shortly before a fire destroyed the establishment on Saturday.

Spending Whatever It Takes

04/24/1998
Staff Writer
Who is Art Beroff, and what makes him think he can win Rep. Charles Schumer’s congressional seat? That’s what a lot of people are asking as Beroff, a 38-year-old investment banker from Howard Beach, Queens, makes the rounds.

Mixed Reviews On Settlement

04/10/1998
Staff Writer
Tamar Adelstein spent the second day of the Crown Heights riots huddled in a bathroom with her five children as a mob pelted her home on President Street with bottles and shouted about shooting the occupants. “We [later] turned off all lights in our home and said tehillim [psalms],” said Adelstein, one of the plaintiffs in the Crown Heights civil suit against New York City that was settled last week.

A Reign Marred By Family Strife

04/28/2006
Associate Editor

After a rabbinical career spanning quaint pre-war Hungarian mountain villages and a 21st century empire in New York with an estimated 50,000 chasidim and several hundred million dollars in assets, the Satmar Grand Rebbe, Moshe Teitelbaum, died this week in Mount Sinai Hospital after suffering from spinal cancer and other ailments. He was 91.

‘It Never Really Gets Easier’

04/03/1998
Staff Writer
During Yankel Rosenbaum’s six months in New York, the fax machine at his parents’ home in Melbourne would grind out a daily letter detailing his exploits. If the Australian scholar, who was doing research here on the Holocaust, missed a letter because of Shabbat or a late cricket game, there would be two letters the following day.
Syndicate content