New York

Greenberg Acres

02/24/2005 - 19:00
Staff Writer
Benyamin Cantz spent his recent days pruning a mountainside vineyard in central California, in the middle of a redwood forest overlooking the Pacific Ocean. At the same time, Rabbi Shmuel Simenowitz was opening trails in southern Vermont, chain saw in hand, in a maple forest near the Massachusetts border.

On The Same Page

02/24/2005 - 19:00
Staff Writer
Several dozen times over the past seven years, the Levine family of Greenwich Village has invited a few friends to a private celebration in a kosher restaurant. Each meal was a siyum, marking the completion of a tractate of Talmud studied by Danny Levine and his two teenage sons. “Usually about eight or nine” people came, Levine said. Tuesday will be the Levine family’s final siyum, but a restaurant couldn’t hold everyone coming.

Whiskey Rebellion

02/17/2005 - 19:00
Staff Writer
If you want to make a l’chaim at some major Orthodox synagogues around New York, you’ll have to wait until after services for kiddush. The shuls have banned kiddush clubs. This comes following the recent decision of the Orthodox Union’s board of directors to encourage its member congregations to discontinue the informal drinking clubs that draw congregants from Saturday morning during services.

Cemetery Settlement Praised

01/27/2005 - 19:00
Staff Writer
The Westchester Jewish community this week praised a $100,000 settlement between a New Jersey real estate developer and the state attorney general that will create a memorial in Yonkers at the site of a shopping center garage built over an abandoned Jewish cemetery. According to the agreement announced Monday by Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, the state will use the settlement to erect a memorial to the Congregation of the People of Righteousness cemetery near the Costco and Home Depot along the state Thruway.

New Suit To Pressure Poles On Property

01/20/2005 - 19:00
Staff Writer
In a test case that will likely increase international pressure on Poland to return billions of dollars of property seized from Jews by the Nazis during World War II and nationalized by the communists after the war, a Polish-born Holocaust survivor is expected to file suit before the European Court of Human Rights in the next few weeks, The Jewish Week has learned. A New York-based not-for-profit law firm is preparing the case on behalf of Henryk Pikielny, who now lives in Paris.

Falash Mura Compound Reopens After Crisis

01/20/2005 - 19:00
Staff Writer
The fenced-in compound operated in Addis Ababa by a New York-based humanitarian organization to feed and educate Falash Mura has returned to its normal schedule after being closed for three weeks recently because of death threats against some of the Falash Mura leaders, according to officials of the North American Conference on Ethiopian Jewry. NACOEJ, which has conducted activities in Ethiopia for two decades, had shut the compound in the wake of accusations of abuse that appeared in the Israeli press and on Ethiopian television.

Easing The Fear Factor

01/20/2005 - 19:00
Staff Writer
The dozen American adults who participated in a recent weeklong tour of Israel sponsored by the Habonim Dror Zionist organization visited Jerusalem and Safed, viewed the Mediterranean from the heights of Haifa, ate a Bedouin-style meal and bathed in hot springs. But for most, the highlight was on the bus: the armed medic who accompanied the group and the tour guide’s Global Positioning Satellite device.

‘They’re Rebuilding Their Lives’

01/13/2005 - 19:00
Staff Writer
For most Americans, the familiar images of the towering tsunami tidal waves that destroyed large parts of Southeast Asia and took more than 150,000 lives two weeks ago are shattered villages and grieving relatives. For one American, a rabbi from Manhattan, who saw the wreckage with his own eyes, there is another memory: merchants still selling merchandise.

Finding Solace

07/26/2001 - 20:00
Staff Writer
Under the silent gaze of his grandparents, Orthodox Jews from Hungary preserved in sepia on his living room wall in Park Slope, Andrew Mark lay dying last year. He was suffering from cancer of the liver and colon, which had spread to the lymphatic system. A sofa bed was set up in the living room. Andrew’s last days would be spent there, cared for by Marion, his wife of 50 years, comforted by their son and daughter, visited weekly by a rabbi and social worker from the Jewish Hospice of Greater New York.

Carry On

12/21/1999 - 19:00
Staff Writer
Pedestrians in Borough Park have noticed a few words spray-painted in white on the pavement of 18th Avenue in recent weeks. “Stop,” reads a warning in English, next to a Hebrew expression that means, “The eruv is until here.” The writing announces that the nylon string some two stories overhead, spanning the road between a bakery and linen shop near 47th Street, marks the outside limit of the neighborhood’s new eruv, a symbolic boundary that allows people to carry items outside of their homes on Shabbat.
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