Well Versed

The Greenest Sukkah

Anyone passing by the JCC in Manhattan over the course of Sukkot would happen upon a peculiar sight – a skeletally crafted hut with maize as a ceiling and bubbling, whirring bottles of variously hued greens embedded in its walls. This is the JCC’s outdoor sukkah, an extension of a larger exhibition “Incubating Ideas and Cultivating Connections: The Greenhouse of Ein Shemer,” present in the center’s lobby and roof.

Sukkot on Amsterdam Avenue. Yaakov Bressler

Fragments From A Long, Wide View

Yale Strom has devoted his life to preserving and rescuing Jewish culture and in particular, klezmer music, in Central and Eastern Europe. As a result, the musician is also a filmmaker, historian, ethnomusicologist, and photographer.

Yale Strom. "Passing the Village Synagogue, Dorohoi, Romania, 1985." Courtesy of Anne Frank Center

Fragments From A Long, Wide View

Yale Strom has devoted his life to preserving and rescuing Jewish culture and in particular, klezmer music, in Central and Eastern Europe. As a result, the musician is also a filmmaker, historian, ethnomusicologist, and photographer.

Yale Strom. "Passing the Village Synagogue, Dorohoi, Romania, 1985." Courtesy of Anne Frank Center

Psalmic Muse

Keeping in mind the Chasidic custom of reciting Psalms during the days leading to Yom Kippur, now would be a perfect time to head up to the scenic Derfner Judaica Museum for Archie Rand’s visual renditions of Psalm 68. 

Archie Rand, Psalm 68:30. Courtesy of the Derfner Judaica Museum

Supporting Israel With Art

Few subjects have troubled Jews across the globe this past summer as much as the recent conflict in Israel. The violence  portrayed on the news stimulated a consequential outpouring of support from Jewish communities worldwide. But an art group based in Brooklyn is showing support through a unique means: a spiritual defense.

Leah Raab. “Huddled in the Tunnel. Courtesy of the Creative Soul

Sharon’s Life And Family Roots Celebrated In Belarus

Ariel Sharon’s grandfather moved to Palestine in 1910 from the town of Brest Litovsk in White Russia. But after two years in Rehovot, enduring hardships, he returned to his native town. Then, in 1922, his son (Ariel Sharon’s father), also made aliyah, to escape persecution. A student of agronomy, he and his wife settled on a moshav northeast of Tel Aviv, where their son was born six years later.  Ariel Sharon would often speak of his childhood on the moshav, Kfar Malal, where his love of the rural life took root. 

Gilad Sharon at the opening of the exhibition. Yossi Aloni

Maurice Sendak’s Papers: Thoughts On An Artist’s Legacy

Maurice Sendak, the beloved and celebrated maker of children’s books, was much more than "Where the Wild Things Are." At his death in 2012, more than 10, 200 pieces of his work –  drawings, watercolors, manuscripts, proof copies and more – resided at the Rosenbach Museum in Philadelphia. The museum had hoped that this situation, which let them stage no fewer than 72 Sendak exhibitions since 1970, would continue. However, Peter Dobrin of the Philadelphia Inquirer recently broke the news that not only did Sendak leave the materials to the Maurice Sendak Foundation, but the foundation’s trustees have asked for their return to Sendak’s Ridgefield, Connecticut home, set to become a museum of sorts itself.

"Maurice Sendak's "Where The Wild Things Are"

Breaking Away, Looking Back

Sara Erenthal likes to think of her one-woman gallery show as a brief memoir. From the moment that visitors walk through the door of the Soapbox Gallery in Brooklyn’s Prospect Heights, they enter her life, first via her childhood bedroom.

The artist Sara Erenthal next to "Eidele Meidele."

A Novella Sparked By Conflict

The Jerusalem Lover," a novella by Shira Dicker, is a prescient and courageous look at the ongoing battle between Israel's staunch defenders and her harsh critics. The work was actually written seven years ago, as Dicker struggled with the “casual anti-Semitism (she)…confronted nearly daily” while living in England during 2004.

"Bathsheba" by Bruce Murray

Bridging Middle East Borders At The Fringe

With the 2014 New York International Fringe Festival upon us, one play stands out among the rest.  Meron Langsner’s “Over Here,” presented by Mortal Folly Theatre, depicts an unlikely friendship between a Palestinian-American and an Israeli immigrant in the rubble of the Twin Towers.

Meron Langsner. Allison McDonough
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