Well Versed

A New New Month Tradition, At Drisha

For the new month of Elul, songwriter Elie Lichtschein introduces his “mysti-folk” version of Hallel to New York. Lichtschein has composed new melodies for the psalms that are traditionally chanted on Rosh Hodesh, the beginning of the new Jewish month.

Elie Lichtschein

Midnight In Times Square


Tonight at 11:57, and every night through the end of August, those passing through Times Square will have the opportunity to see artist Jack Goldstein’s film “The Jump” on more than 15 large digital screens, usually displaying ads.

Jack Goldstein, "The Jump," 1978,16mm color silent film. Courtesy of Galerie Daniel Buchholz and the Estate of Jack Goldstein

Old Jews, Jokes And Birthdays

Approaching his 62nd birthday, my husband announced he wanted to be a stand-up comedian.  I do laugh at his jokes, but a stand-up? I don’t know…..I took him to see “Old Jews Telling Jokes,” playing off-Broadway, on his birthday for a taste of the classics.

Mediterranean On The Hudson

Set against the imagined backdrop of Israel’s portion of the Mediterranean Sea, Amos Pinhasi opened this year’s Between the Seas Festival last Monday evening with “Mediterraneo.” The piece, combining dance and performance art, was meant to delve into the dancer’s own memories of his childhood in Israel.

Amos Pinhasi in "Mediterraneo." Flavia Zaganelli

Natalie Portman To Direct, Write And Star In Amos Oz’s “A Tale Of Love And Darkness”

Natalie Portman will be making her debut as a feature film director with her own adaptation of Amos Oz’s 2002 memoir, “A Tale of Love and Darkness” – and she plans to play his troubled mother.

Getty Images

Tales Of The City, Piece By Piece

As much as we may yearn to transcend the material, we live with "stuff." Inspired by the British Museum and the BBC’s hugely successful “A History of the World in 100 Objects,New School curators Radhika Subramaniam and Margot Bouman present New York through the everyday (the subway token, the public phone booth), the overlooked (a boot scraper, a rat bait trap), the iconic (the Empire State Building, Metropolitan Museum badges) and the mundane (black umbrellas, a coffee cup, sneakers).

Photo by Martin Seck

More Sendak: Let The Wild Rumpus Start

I was about six when my aunt handed me a book to read to my younger cousin – a tiny red book that fit perfectly in the palm of my hand. I can still recall my wonder at the joyful anarchy of the eponymous Pierre, who was my age, talked back and just didn’t care. 

(c) The Estate of Maurice Sendak

Sewing Memories

Maya Chaimovich’s quilts were not meant to warm a bed. The Israeli quilter makes exquisite art, using colored threads and fabric to create painterly, impressionistic brush strokes.

Maya Chaimovich, "In Memorial." Courtesy of The Art Quilt Gallery

Dreaming In Chelsea

After having lived in Israel for a few years, Andrea Meislin has become an advocate of Israeli photography and the group show now on view in her eponymous gallery is a testimony to that devotion.  Over half the works featured in “Perchance to Dream,” which address themes of sleep and intimacy, are by Israeli artists; and unfairly or not, association with Israel brings with it a specific political and international urgency.

Adi Nes, Untitled, 1999. Digital C-print. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Yesterday’s Broadsides – From The Valmadonna Trust Library – Still Gripping Today

Broadsides were never meant to survive. Defined as a single printed sheet posted in public, broadsides convey immediate information about a vast number of subjects: changes in the law, upcoming weddings or bnai mitzvot, the details of a death or a funeral, the arrival of the circus, just to name a few.

Menorah blessings, Calcutta, c. 1890. Ardon Bar-Hama
Syndicate content