Peace Talks

Palestinian State Of Mind

Air Force One hadn’t even touched town at Andrews Air Force Base outside Washington, but Jewish activists on Tuesday already were fighting over the symbolism of President Bill Clinton’s groundbreaking and controversial trip to Israel, Gaza and the West Ba

12/18/1998
Washington Correspondent
Palestinian State Of Mind by James D. Besser Washington Correspondent Air Force One hadn’t even touched town at Andrews Air Force Base outside Washington, but Jewish activists on Tuesday already were fighting over the symbolism of President Bill Clinton’s groundbreaking and controversial trip to Israel, Gaza and the West Bank. Jewish leaders representing all points on the ideological spectrum did agree on one thing: the symbol-laden trip could be a turning point in U.S.-Israel and U.S.-Palestinian relations.

Once Oslo Cheerleader, America Now Referee

10/30/1998
Washington Correspondent
Washington — From cheerleader of Oslo to indispensable mediator to arbiter and chief referee. That’s the road of good intentions the U.S. administration has traveled as Israeli-Palestinian relations deteriorated over the last two years. But with the CIA primed to wade neck deep into actually arbitrating the Palestinians terror-fighting performance, as outlined in last week’s breakthrough Wye agreement, American Jewish leaders are edgy.

U.S. Threatens To Leave Peace Talks

07/17/1998
Washington Correspondent
U.S. efforts to revive Israeli-Palestinian talks entered the “end game” this week, but it remained to be seen whether this round would be any more conclusive than several other recent diplomatic end games. On Monday, the State Department indicated that Israeli and Palestinian negotiators would resume direct talks, possibly as early as this week, but not at the highest levels.

Squeeze Play For Jewish Leaders as Clinton Peace Efforts Accelerate

04/03/1998
Washington Correspondent
American Jewish leaders felt squeezed this week. They were caught between the Israeli government, which wants them to man the barricades against what is perceived to be a sweeping new American plan for breaking the Israeli-Palestinian deadlock, and the Clinton administration, which is seeking an amber light to pursue its “bridging proposals” in the moribund negotiations.

On A Collision Course

Washington and Jerusalem appeared on a collision course this week as the Clinton administration pressed forward with a series of proposals for ending the Israeli-Palestinian stalemate

03/27/1998
Washington Correspondent
by James D. Besser Washington Correspondent Washington and Jerusalem appeared on a collision course this week as the Clinton administration pressed forward with a series of proposals for ending the Israeli-Palestinian stalemate that the Netanyahu government regards as dangerous and intrusive.

The Hurdle Ahead

Benjamin Netanyahu and Yasir Arafat face the threat of that agreement’s broader collapse at their summit near Washington this week.

10/16/1998
Staff Writers
Even as they wade through a swamp of unresolved controversies on their interim peace agreement amid distrust exacerbated by a terrorist murder, Benjamin Netanyahu and Yasir Arafat face the threat of that agreement’s broader collapse at their summit near Washington this week.

The Hurdle Ahead

Benjamin Netanyahu and Yasir Arafat face the threat of that agreement’s broader collapse at their summit near Washington this week.

10/16/1998
Staff Writers
Even as they wade through a swamp of unresolved controversies on their interim peace agreement amid distrust exacerbated by a terrorist murder, Benjamin Netanyahu and Yasir Arafat face the threat of that agreement’s broader collapse at their summit near Washington this week.

Realignment In The Making?

12/17/2008
Staff Writer
In endorsing Tuesday the Israeli-Palestinian peace process begun by the United States, the United Nations Security Council also adopted its three core principles: mutual recognition, the end to violence and a two-state solution built upon previous agreements. “Israel welcomes all the support we receive from the international community and moderate nations in the region regarding the peace process,” Israeli UN Ambassador Gabriela Shalev told reporters. “But we want to remind everybody that all negotiations are bilateral.”

Peace Process On Dual Tracks

05/13/2009
Staff Writer
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu spoke again this week of shortly resuming Palestinian peace talks, an upbeat message echoed here by Israeli President Shimon Peres. “The government of Benjamin Netanyahu is going to make peace,” Peres declared at a luncheon last week organized by the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations. Peres’ optimism came following a one-hour meeting at the White House with President Barack Obama.

‘Forward Momentum’ With Syria Elusive

03/11/2009
Staff Writer
Syrian President Bashar Assad’s assertion this week that relations with Israel will be normalized only when the Palestinian conflict is resolved has “poured cold water on the Syrian track,” according to Dore Gold, a senior foreign policy adviser to Prime Minister-designate Benjamin Netanyahu. Gold was referring to Assad’s interview in the United Arab Emirates daily Al-Khaleej, in which Assad was quoted as saying that a peace agreement with Israel is possible that would perhaps include an embassy and formalities.
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