Peace Talks

Talk Gains Of Peace Initiative

11/03/2006
Staff Writer
Even as Israeli troops mounted their largest raid on Palestinian terrorists in the Gaza Strip since the June 25 abduction of an Israeli soldier, there was continued talk about a prisoner exchange that could be linked to the jump starting of regional peace talks.

Return Of The Road Map

09/22/2006
Staff Writer
The road map, the international plan for Israeli-Palestinian peace, has been dusted off and is once again the principal initiative being pursued by Israel with the Palestinians: even though much skepticism surrounds it. Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert made the announcement last weekend after meeting with British Prime Minister Tony Blair. "I'm sticking to my position that the diplomatic process with the Palestinians should continue in accordance with the road map," he said.

Same Old New Initiative

12/01/2006
Staff Writer
When Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert promised on Monday to work towards a peace agreement resulting in a Palestinian state with territorial contiguity, some viewed it as a bold new initiative, while others dismissed it as nothing new. The speech, made at the burial site in Sde Boker of David Ben-Gurion, Israel's first prime minister, came just one day after a cease-fire went into effect in Gaza to end five months of conflict in which more than 300 Palestinians and five Israelis were reportedly killed.

Bush Lowers Mideast Expectations

05/14/2008
Staff Writer
As he visits Israel this week for the second time in four months, President George W. Bush has scaled down his expectations for an Israeli-Palestinian agreement. Instead of the optimism he displayed late last year when he spoke of the creation of a Palestinian state before he left office, Bush told Israeli journalists Monday that he was hoping the two sides could “get a state defined by the end of my presidency.”

Left Seen Awakening Over Netzarim Debate

10/31/2003
Staff Writer
Israelís peace movement, largely dormant since Ariel Sharon was first elected prime minister three years ago, resurfaced last weekend amid calls for a political framework for peace and withdrawal from a contentious settlement in Gaza. An estimated 4,000 Israelis took to the street Saturday night to protest Sharon's policies in a demonstration outside his Jerusalem residence. Naomi Chazan, a former Knesset member from the left-wing Meretz Party and one of the participants, said this was the first major demonstration against Sharon.

Support From The States

10/27/2000
Staff Writers
Local Jewish leaders returned from a 37-hour solidarity trip to Israel this week strengthened in their resolve that, as UJA-Federation executive vice president John Ruskay put it, "We're all in this together." He added that Israelis seemed committed to "stand firm, particularly after the prime minister had made such an offer for peace" this summer at Camp David. But Ruskay also sensed "an undercurrent of despondency. The choices are difficult and limited, and that's what makes this a crisis."

Israel Warily Eyes Peace

06/06/2003
Staff Writer
Even as Wednesday's summit meeting in Aqaba, Jordan, kicked off the first steps down the road map to achieving Israeli-Palestinian peace, the government of Israel is continuing to erect an elaborate security barrier to separate Israel from Palestinian communities in the West Bank. Gerald Steinberg, a political science professor at Bar-Ilan University, called the multimillion-dollar barrier a costly "insurance policy."

Israel May Test Abbas In Gaza

05/23/2003
Staff Writer
The terrorist rampage this week that killed 12 Israelis in five suicide bombings within 48 hours is being seen by Israeli leaders as orchestrated by Palestinian President Yasir Arafat to undermine the leadership of his new prime minister. Israeli leaders were said to have few military options left to stop the terror attacks, which also scuttled nascent peace efforts.

Israel Puts Skids

05/09/2003
Staff Writer
When Secretary of State Colin Powell arrives in Israel this weekend to discuss the "road map" for peace, he will find Palestinian President Yasir Arafat still firmly in control of the Palestinian Authority and Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon refusing to even discuss the plan until the Palestinians give up their right-of-return to Israel. "The big issue is that Arafat is still in control and there has been no regime change," said Gerald Steinberg, a professor of political science at Bar-Ilan University.

Right Of Return May Kill Talks

04/18/2003
Staff Writer
In a move that could scuttle renewed Israeli-Palestinian peace efforts now that the war in Iraq is over, the Palestinians have included in their new constitution their right to return to homes they fled in 1948. But the Israeli government insisted this week that the "road map" toward the creation of a Palestinian state be amended to preclude the right of return.
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