Jewish Techs

An occasional column from Jason Miller, a rabbi and tech maven.

The iPad Wedding

I've written on this blog about Jewish weddings and other Jewish life cycle events that have welcomed Skype technology. The newest way to bring loved ones from far way into the simcha is through an iPad or other tablet device. 

Rabbi Rachel Kobrin watched the grandfather of the bride deliver a wedding speech via iPad

Israeli Engineer Creates Universal Remote App for the Man Cave

Using your iPhone or Android-powered smartphone to operate your television, Blue-Ray player, DVD, stereo, or well, anything else electronic in your house should really be a no-brainer at the end of 2011. After all, I remember using several PDA’s from the Sony Clie to the Palm/Handspring models to operate my TV as far back as a decade ago. However, there has been a dearth of apps available for download that allow you to control your entertainment system (although this is a standard feature of the Sony Tablet S).

Itai Ben-Gal & Victor Nemirovsky simply wanted to create a universal remote app, but launched a million-dollar company instead

Jewish Day Schools and Technology: Trying to Strike the Right Balance

I still remember the time in 1st grade when my father brought our Apple II Plus into the classroom in an effort to show my classmates the wonders of Turtle Graphics. It was 1982 and each little 1st grader waited in line to get a chance to touch the odd looking keyboard and try to make the little turtle move. My father beamed with pride as he watched each child get their three-minute opportunity to try to program the blinking green turtle cursor to move across the black screen.

Technology in the schools has advanced from blackboards and graphing paper to SMART Boards and tablets.

109 Years of American Jewish History Goes Digital

The Journal of Jewish Communal Service (JJCS) is now available in digital form on the Web thanks to the work of the Berman Jewish Policy Archive at NYU's Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. The BJPA was established through generous support from the philanthropist Mandell ("Bill") Berman of Detroit and the Charles H. Revson Foundation.

Is Siri Jewish?

Everyone's talking about Siri -- the Q&A app that responds to voice commands on the new iPhone 4S. Here's a great article by Leo Margul for JointMedia News Service that ran on eJewishPhilanthropy:

 

How #GiladShalit Became More Famous Than Gilad Shalit

Ynet News is reporting that the Israeli prime minister's emissary to the negotiations for a prisoner exchange deal with Hamas to return the captive Gilad Shalit said "it's not over yet. The deal reached is pretty complicated, but the most difficult part is behind us." The former Mossad agent turned Gilad Shalit negotiator, David Meidan, added that he plans to travel to Egypt soon, together with the negotiation team, to plan Gilad Shalit's return to Israel.

The Free Gilad Shalit Campaign gained traction early on Twitter

Gefilte Fish Gets Its Own Video Game

I thought something smelled fishy when I received an email from fellow blogger Esther Kustanowitz today. Indeed it was. I was hopeful that the skilled writer had sent me a well-crafted sermon that I could simply deliver on Rosh Hashanah morning, but instead it was only an email to inform me that her friend Asael Kahana of K/Logic had created an interactive Rosh Hashanah card that is a mashup between Gefilte fish and Space Invaders.

Asael Kahana draws on his Gefilte fetish to create video game for Rosh Hashanah

Dead Sea Scrolls: From Qumran Caves to Museums to the Web

After the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered in a cave in Qumran in the winter of 1946–47 by Muhammed edh-Dhib, a Bedouin boy, and his cousin, it still took two decades until they were placed on display in a museum.

The Dead Sea Scrolls are now online thanks to Google

Learning About Social Media From Nuns Using Facebook

As Social Media has become more popular over the past few years, an emerging field of study and consulting has emerged. All of a sudden everyone is a social media maven. The youngest employee (or intern) at law offices, accounting firms, medical practices, restaurants and non-profit organizations suddenly become the in-house social media experts charged with the task of creating Facebook pages and keeping them updated.

What can we learn about using social media from nuns?

FaceGlat May Be a More Modest Facebook But It's Not Hacker-Proof

FaceGlat, the ultra-Orthodox social networking site, is an attempt to offer Haredi Jews the experience of Facebook without all the immodesty. From the opening page it reminds one of public restrooms with a sign for men to enter through one door and women to enter through their own door. FaceGlat's name is a mashup of Facebook and glatt, the term for kosher meat considered to be a higher standard of kosher because of the source animal's smooth lungs.

The ultra-Orthodox version of Facebook gets hacked by Palestinian hackers from Jordan for the second time.
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