Jewish Techs

An occasional column from Jason Miller, a rabbi and tech maven.

Facebook Driving Deal to Buy Israeli Navigation App Waze

Let the jokes begin. From the people who wandered in the desert for 40 years comes the best navigational app so far. Waze, an Israeli crowdsourced navigation mobile application, has been growing in popularity over the past couple years. And in the past half a year there have been more than a few rumors that Waze was on the verge of being bought by Apple and Facebook. Those deals never materialized and some say it was because Uri Levine and his investment partners at Waze were holding out for more.

Will Facebook pay $1 billion for Israeli startup Waze?

In Memory Of A Mother Who Loved The Shema, A New Bedtime App For Kids

One of my favorite times of each day is my children’s bedtime. I enjoy watching them perform the nightly rituals before bed and then I join them in saying the bedtime Shema prayer. I recently spoke with kindergarten students and their parents at my children’s day school about Jewish bedtime rituals. For the second year, I heard parents tell me about their own enjoyment in tucking their children into bed. It’s a special time for parent-child bonding, so many of them explained. And Judaism recognizes the opportunity for both spirituality and education during these precious few moments before falling fast sleep.

The app, in memory of the creators' mother. Photo courtesy Rusty Brick

Track Obama In Israel On iPhone Or Droid

03/20/2013
Special To The Jewish Week

In the old days the White House tried to protect the location of POTUS (that’s the president’s name to insiders). Today, with the 24-7 news cycle people demand to know where the leader of the free world is at all times. The White House posts President Obama’s schedule on its website so people know which lunches he’s speaking at, when he’s welcoming the Super Bowl champs to the White House, when he’s shooting hoops with his buddies and when he’s at a state dinner.

Rabbi Jason Miller

Kindle Your Judaism: Growing Jewish Literacy Through New Technology

Ask most rabbis what their number one recommendation is for "saving" the Jewish future and they will point to Jewish literacy. Helping young Jews become more literate about Jewish history, culture and religion is a top priority for Jewish leaders on college campuses. The way to do this is by getting them to read books about a whole host of Jewish themes and topics. Rather than telling college students to read a history of the Jewish people and having them feel like they have one more 4-credit course to take, innovative Jewish educators are envisioning new ways to encourage Jewish literacy. I was impressed when I learned of a new program being implemented at Brown University to get college students excited about reading books with Jewish themes.

Brown University is launching a new program providing Jewish-themed books to students on a free Amazon Kindle.

Hitler Slips Into A Google App Store

Apple has been criticized by mobile app makers for the difficult process involved in getting their apps into the AppStore. The reason for all the red tape in this process, however, is so Apple can approve each app for content ensuring there is no hate speech or racist material in the app. In France, Apple has even removed an app that was in violation of that country's strong policy on anti-Semitism.

A guest at the party opening Google's offices in Berlin. Getty Images

NoahPozner.com - Exploiting A Tragedy

When the names of the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School tragedy in Newtown, Connecticut were announced, Jewish media outlets immediately published articles about the youngest victim Noah Pozner, the 6-year-old who was laid to rest earlier this week in a traditional Jewish funeral.

Noah Pozner was the youngest of the 1st grade victims at the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting.

The Politics of Israel in Social Media

Spending a week in Israel earlier this month I kept my eyes open to the way Israelis use technology. Even on my first visit over 18 years ago I noticed that Israelis thirsted for the latest tech gadgets. Being a country that struggled with telecommunications early on in its existence made Israel primed for a telecom revolution. In the first decades of statehood, stories permeated about families who waited years just to get a telephone in their home. So when mobile communications took off in the middle of the 1990s, Israelis were eager to adopt the new technology.

Laura Ben David was shocked to look at her Facebook profile and see her location changed from Israel to Palestine.

Finding Religion Online

Ever since the old AmericaOnline, people have used the Internet as a way to learn more about religion and to engage with likeminded co-religionists. The Senior Religion Editor of Huffington Post, Paul Raushenbush, published an interesting article about the search for religion on the Web. He writes that "Religion is one of the hottest areas of the Internet because religion is one of the most intense and contested arenas of human relations and ideas." He's right.

The Web is the first place many people look to learn more about religion

The First War Played Out On Social Networks

Social media changes the zeitgeist in ways we couldn't have imagined. As we saw with the recent presidential election, opinions and attacks now travel at the speed of light. And so it should be no surprise that the ongoing Middle East conflict in Gaza between the Palestinians and Israelis has escalated into a Cyber war.

Synagogues, Social Media & Sandy

Hurricane Sandy was the first major U.S. storm of the Twitter era. Like so many others, I was following the storm using social media, including Facebook and Twitter updates. Worried about friends in the East Coast, I tried to gauge just how devastating this act of nature was going to be.

One thing I noticed was that synagogues and temples along the Eastern corridor were using new media communication efforts to keep their membership informed about the storm, the cancellation of schools and programs, and to offer help to those in need (both during and after the storm).

During and after Hurricane Sandy synagogues that had power used social media to keep congregants informed.
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