Special Sections

A World In A Decade

Jewish Week Book Critic
11/10/2009
As we near the end of the first decade of the new century, I wonder which books we’ll later look back on as best capturing our present time. This season, several new books are fine period pieces, conjuring other eras. Non-fiction narratives depict a particular time and place through research and documentation; novels do so through invention, embellishing actual events.

Last Act

Staff Writer
11/10/2009
It is understandable that many Philip Roth admirers have been disappointed by his recent novels. Hanging over them all is Roth’s morbid fixation on death, and not even graceful deaths, but ones of an utterly savage, genuinely tragic kind. Here is the exuberant writer who gave us “Portnoy’s Complaint,” (1969) about a postwar adolescent brimming with libidinous energy, now coming up with “Indignation,” (2008) where a studious, straight-A student dies before having barely been laid.

Getting Around Grandma’s Chicken Soup

Associate Editor
11/10/2009
With his much-hyped new book, “Eating Animals,” Jonathan Safran Foer has managed to do something that my vegetarian husband and daughter have been unable to pull off: sworn me off meat, at least all conventionally raised meat.

Charitable Giving 2009

Staff Writer
09/22/2009
Charitable Giving Directory  
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SPRING ARTS-THEATER LIST

02/13/2009
 “Irena’s Vow.” Tovah Feldshuh moves to Broadway in this play about a Polish Catholic housekeeper who hid Jews in the basement of the Nazi’s officer’s villa in which she worked. Previews March 10th and opens March 29 at the Walter Kerr Theatre. For tickets, $41-$98, call Telecharge at (212) 239-6200.

MUSIC

02/13/2009
Special To The Jewish Week
Resurrection: Two classical ensembles and a new Web site pay tribute to the music of the Shoah. Holocaust scholars and intellectuals in allied fields have argued for most of the past six and a half decades whether there was such a thing as a cultural resistance to the Shoah. Did creating works of art in the confines of Terezin constitute a rebuke to the Nazis or an unwitting submission? In the face of such brutal inhumanity, how powerful a subversive act could a piece of music, a painting or a performance be?

Moving On To The Next Tragedy

Staff Writer
09/22/2009
Eight years after the Twin Towers crumbled over downtown Manhattan, rescue worker Charlie Giles still wakes up regularly with nightmares of the North Tower collapsing on top of him, enveloping his body his flames and in suffocating debris. One night recently, he even woke up to find himself throwing things. “I said to my wife, ‘He’s in our room, he’s in our room,’” Giles remembers. “She said, ‘Who’s in our room?’ I said, ‘bin Laden.’”
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