Special Sections

36 Under 36 2009: Taylor Krauss, 29

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

 It was his connection to the Holocaust that led Taylor Krauss to live halfway around the world in Rwanda. As a film student at Yale University, Krauss had visited the Fortunoff Video Archive of Holocaust Testimonies, which started collecting survivor testimonies in 1982, and remembered the stories he’d heard later when he was in Rwanda working on a documentary.

36 Under 36 2009: Simcha Gross, 22

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

 Simcha Gross’s biggest problem? Too many attendees.

When an unprecedented 850 people showed up to the second Tanach Yom Iyun at Yeshiva University last December, Gross and Yehudah Bernstein, his fellow coordinator, had to scramble to find seats. And they couldn’t be happier.

"I believe in the passionate pursuit for religious truth," says Gross, who began formulating the program when he arrived at YU as a sophomore, and saw the first Yom Iyun take place last March.

36 Under 36 2009: Seth and Isaac Galena, 31

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

Seth and Isaac Galena have been a two-man comedy team ever since the womb. Shortly after they graduated from Yeshiva University, the twin brothers started a Web site, bangitout.com, which quickly morphed from daily jokes that tipped their hats to Jewish life to a clearinghouse for apartments, jobs and other connections and resonated strongly with their modern Orthodox peers on Manhattan’s Upper West Side.

"Now it’s kind of a brand, and it’s pretty cool to establish a brand," says Seth (on right), whose day job is in advertising.

36 Under 36 2009: Ran Fuchs, 30

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

Moving back and forth from Tel Aviv to New York as a child, 30-year-old Ran Fuchs describes himself as the quintessential Israeli-American hybrid. Ultimately, he and his parents settled in New York, but he never felt completely at home in either place. "In the United States I felt very Israeli, and in Israel I felt very American," he says.

36 Under 36 2009: Ran Fuchs, 30

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

Moving back and forth from Tel Aviv to New York as a child, 30-year-old Ran Fuchs describes himself as the quintessential Israeli-American hybrid. Ultimately, he and his parents settled in New York, but he never felt completely at home in either place. "In the United States I felt very Israeli, and in Israel I felt very American," he says.

36 Under 36 2009: Rabbi Yehuda Sarna, 30

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

Watching him in the kosher café at NYU, his BlackBerry on the table while he talks with a student, you would be forgiven for mistaking Rabbi Yehuda Sarna for an undergraduate himself. But Rabbi Sarna has served as the rabbi for the Bronfman Center for Jewish Student Life at NYU since 2002, also founding the Jewish Learning Initiative on campus in 2005, building a reputation for engaging Jewish students in creative ways and for encouraging interreligious dialogue, especially through his close friendship with NYU Imam Khalid Latif.

36 Under 36 2009: Rabbi Ethan Tucker, 33

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

Since being awarded the Grinspoon Jewish Social Entrepreneur Fellowship in February 2008, Rabbi Ethan Tucker has been busy using the $100,000 at his disposal to realize his dreams, and continuing to work on the projects that made him worthy of the award in the first place.

36 Under 36 2009: Michelle Citrin, 28

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

After college she started touring as a musician, and she visited Israel on a Birthright trip, which she credits for the Jewish themes that began to seep into her folk music. Back in America and on the road, she visited places like Nebraska and South Dakota, where many people had never met Jews. "People gasped when I said I was Jewish; they were looking for the horns," she says. Ultimately, though, she was happy to be open about her Judaism: "I was a reference point for people, and I welcomed it."

36 Under 36 2009: Michael Winograd, 26

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

There’s something distinctly retrograde about Michael Winograd, and it’s not just that he plays klezmer. It’s that he plays klezmer precisely how it was played 100 years ago. Unlike other popular musicians who’ve melded the music with more contemporary fare — the rapper SoCalled, the punk-slanted star Daniel Kahn — Winograd sticks to the genre’s roots. Now 26, he’s been playing the clarinet since he was 14 and first attended the renowned Catskill summit called KlezKamp.

36 Under 36 2009: Michael Winograd, 26

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

There’s something distinctly retrograde about Michael Winograd, and it’s not just that he plays klezmer. It’s that he plays klezmer precisely how it was played 100 years ago. Unlike other popular musicians who’ve melded the music with more contemporary fare — the rapper SoCalled, the punk-slanted star Daniel Kahn — Winograd sticks to the genre’s roots. Now 26, he’s been playing the clarinet since he was 14 and first attended the renowned Catskill summit called KlezKamp.

Syndicate content