Special Sections

Kotel Schnorrer Pleased With Portfolio Rebound

02/26/2010

 In March of 2007, after nearly 40 years of schnorring at the Kotel plaza, Yonky “Gelt Schmeller” Pakolovich was ready to retire.  At 61 he felt it was time to pack in his pushka  and spend some quality time with his 18 children and 411 grandchildren.  Unfortunately, the financial crisis hit and Yonky’s plans came to a crashing halt.

Jews Still Can’t Find J Street In Washington

02/26/2010

After almost two years of existence, J Street, a left-wing political peace movement, still cannot be found on any pro-Israel map of Washington, D.C. Google maps and GPS are equally unable to identify the controversial lobby. “I’m sorry I don’t think there is a J street in D.C.,” said a confused Zionist tourist checking his map again.

“Did you say it was pro-Israel? Nope, I got nothing here.” Map officials say that J Street can be found on pro-Palestinian maps of Washington, though.

Tiger Woods: “Bogey Man Loves His Niblick’

02/23/2010

The highest-paid professional athlete in 2008, having earned an estimated $110 million from winnings and endorsements, explained the secret to his golf success as well as his subsequent loss of endorsements, family, and reputation with one word: Putts.

“It’s the secret to everything I’ve become,” admitted Woods. “And believe me, it takes one to know one.”

Winter Olympics Of Rabbinic Scandals Held In Vancouver; Rabbis Held In Contempt

02/23/2010

Alone won the overall individual competition, scoring highest in Most Shocking and Disturbing Revelation of the Year – in his case for alleged abuse of boys.

Dozens of lesser-known rabbis in the US, Canada and Israel tied for second in the fiercely contested category.

Rabbi Booshaw N. Chleemaw, chairman of the inaugural games, explained that he and his colleagues around the world felt that rabbinic scandals had become “so pervasive, sophisticated and significant” in recent years that they 

Great Shopping (And History, Too)

12/05/2007
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — Residents of Mamilla, a century-old neighborhood located right outside the Old City of Jerusalem, have been eyewitnesses to many important events in the city’s turbulent history.

In 1948 and 1967, they either fled or shuttered themselves in their homes as soldiers fought on their doorsteps. Now, during happier times, they watch tens of thousands of Israelis march to the Western Wall to celebrate holidays.

Surf, Sand And Sons (And Daughters)

06/22/2007
Israel Correspondent

For many Israeli families, the word "vacation" is synonymous with "Eilat."

That’s because the town, which is located at Israel’s southernmost tip, on the Gulf of Aqaba, has great weather almost year round and boasts an unbelievable amount of attractions.

Facing Israel’s ‘Katrina’

11/01/2006
Israel Correspondent

JERUSALEM — When northerners holed up in bomb shelters needed food during the recent war between Israel and Hezbollah, local municipalities contacted non-profit organizations, which in turn delivered the food at their own expense. Numerous other organizations and individuals delivered everything from medications and toys to the northerners, most of whom had fled to the hot, neglected shelters with little more than the clothes on their backs.

Striking Distance

01/09/2008
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — There were a few spots available this week in the gated parking lot outside the Hebrew University’s Givat Ram campus. That’s about the only good news that has so far come out of the strike by 4,500 senior faculty members of the country’s seven universities, the longest such strike in the country’s history.

Launched in October, just after the start of the new semester (and five months after university students waged a strike) the faculty strike has wreaked havoc in an already troubled higher education system.

Conquering The Screen

06/22/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Consider Thorold Dickinson’s 1954 film "Hill 24 Doesn’t Answer" and Baruch Dinar’s landmark 1960 drama "They Were Ten." Each film has a tragic ending in which the death of Zionist patriots is a necessary prelude to the founding of a Jewish state. Then look at Uri Zohar’s "Every Bastard a King" and Joseph Millo’s "He Walked Through the Fields," both made late in 1967 (although the latter is set in 1948), both guardedly upbeat, with heroic protagonists who cheerfully rush through shot and shell to victory.

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