Special Sections

Great Shopping (And History, Too)

12/05/2007
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — Residents of Mamilla, a century-old neighborhood located right outside the Old City of Jerusalem, have been eyewitnesses to many important events in the city’s turbulent history.

In 1948 and 1967, they either fled or shuttered themselves in their homes as soldiers fought on their doorsteps. Now, during happier times, they watch tens of thousands of Israelis march to the Western Wall to celebrate holidays.

Surf, Sand And Sons (And Daughters)

06/22/2007
Israel Correspondent

For many Israeli families, the word "vacation" is synonymous with "Eilat."

That’s because the town, which is located at Israel’s southernmost tip, on the Gulf of Aqaba, has great weather almost year round and boasts an unbelievable amount of attractions.

Facing Israel’s ‘Katrina’

11/01/2006
Israel Correspondent

JERUSALEM — When northerners holed up in bomb shelters needed food during the recent war between Israel and Hezbollah, local municipalities contacted non-profit organizations, which in turn delivered the food at their own expense. Numerous other organizations and individuals delivered everything from medications and toys to the northerners, most of whom had fled to the hot, neglected shelters with little more than the clothes on their backs.

Striking Distance

01/09/2008
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — There were a few spots available this week in the gated parking lot outside the Hebrew University’s Givat Ram campus. That’s about the only good news that has so far come out of the strike by 4,500 senior faculty members of the country’s seven universities, the longest such strike in the country’s history.

Launched in October, just after the start of the new semester (and five months after university students waged a strike) the faculty strike has wreaked havoc in an already troubled higher education system.

Conquering The Screen

06/22/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Consider Thorold Dickinson’s 1954 film "Hill 24 Doesn’t Answer" and Baruch Dinar’s landmark 1960 drama "They Were Ten." Each film has a tragic ending in which the death of Zionist patriots is a necessary prelude to the founding of a Jewish state. Then look at Uri Zohar’s "Every Bastard a King" and Joseph Millo’s "He Walked Through the Fields," both made late in 1967 (although the latter is set in 1948), both guardedly upbeat, with heroic protagonists who cheerfully rush through shot and shell to victory.

Allowing Kids To Make The Decisions

03/12/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

It’s not surprising that a committee at UJA-Federation of New York is now in the process of reviewing grant proposals, looking at agency budgets and visiting those same agencies. It’s the sort of work that typifies the allocation of money by any large charity, be it federation or another organization.

Head Start — And More — For Ethiopian Kids

01/09/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

Rehovot, Israel — Seated in tiny chairs organized in the shape of a horseshoe, 32 kindergarteners watch attentively as their teacher, Vered Reinstein, asks them how to spell the word “Shalom” in Hebrew.  Eager hands wave as Reinstein chooses a boy to pluck the letter “shin” off a felt board, a girl to find the “vav,” until the four-letter word is completed.

An Italian Philosophy Inspires Jewish Preschools

01/09/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

On a recent winter morning the 130 children attending the nursery school at Manhattan’s Stephen Wise Free Synagogue are engaged in such hands-on projects as building a sukkah, maintaining a rooftop garden and creating small clay sculptures. Some have designed a replica of the Brooklyn Bridge, made from Styrofoam and other objects, while each class has met with a Jewish scribe to learn about a project that involves the entire congregation: the drafting of a Torah to mark the synagogue’s 100th anniversary.

 

An Italian Philosophy Inspires Jewish Preschools

01/09/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

On a recent winter morning the 130 children attending the nursery school at Manhattan’s Stephen Wise Free Synagogue are engaged in such hands-on projects as building a sukkah, maintaining a rooftop garden and creating small clay sculptures. Some have designed a replica of the Brooklyn Bridge, made from Styrofoam and other objects, while each class has met with a Jewish scribe to learn about a project that involves the entire congregation: the drafting of a Torah to mark the synagogue’s 100th anniversary.

 

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