Special Sections

Bridal Jewelry Going Less Traditional

Special To The Jewish Week
05/26/2010

Jerusalem — On their wedding 

             day, brides wear the most beautiful

     jewelry they can buy or borrow. To the groom, his finance’s deliberations over which necklace or headpiece to wear can feel like an obsession.  

While many Israeli women, especially if they are very religious, continue to choose traditional strands of pearls or a diamond pendant with matching earrings for their wedding day, an increasing number of Israeli brides are going the less-traditional route. 

This Negrin necklace is made of clusters of crystals. Inset: A lyrical necklace from the Hedya Design Studio.

No Texting During The Haftorah!

Welcome to etiquette boot camp for the bar/bat mitzvah set.

Special to the Jewish Week
05/26/2010

Send in your RSVP on time. Don’t show up at the bar mitzvah party in sneakers. And no text messaging during the bar mitzvah boy’s speech.

Has Miss Manners gone Jewish? Maybe not but a growing number of yeshiva day schools are arming their students with such etiquette tips before they take their spin on the bar/bat mitzvah circuit.

The Gifted Child

Special To The Jewish Week
05/26/2010

 When my niece Simone turned 4, I instinctively knew what she would treasure: a set of miniature-sized nail polish in brilliant hues of red and pink. She smiled at those tiny bottles all evening; even with the lids closed, lined up like dolls on our coffee table, they delivered endless amusement. 

The Book on Gifts: "The Book Thief"

Adding Meat To The Kosher Indian Plate

Special To The Jewish Week
05/26/2010

 At certain times of the day, the stretch of Lexington Avenue from 26th to 30th streets is fragrant with the aroma of cardamom, cloves, cumin, ginger and the other spices that fire up Indian cuisine. Taxis park all along the side streets, as their drivers take their breaks in the Indian restaurants, fast-food places, sari and spice shops that dominate the neighborhood known alternatively as Curry Hill and Little India. Diners include couples, colleagues and families, with men in turbans as well as kippot, as several of the restaurants are under rabbinic supervision.

The soon-to-open Shalom Bombay on Lexington Avenue just north of Curry Hill. courtesy of shalom bombay

Celebrate May 2010

Hot Indian food, the quest for the perfect bar mitzvah gift, simcha etiquette boot camp, edgy bridal jewelry and more

05/26/2010

Hot Indian food, the quest for the perfect bar mitzvah gift, simcha etiquette boot camp, edgy bridal jewelry and more

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Hotdogs And Israel: An Unexpected Friendship

05/25/2010

On the corner of Fifth Avenue and Fifty-Ninth Street is a Sabrett hotdog stand, which is usually busy. Especially on Sundays, and particularly during a big parade.

But on this Sunday, May 23, vendor Manuel Ordóñez, a middle-aged native of Honduras, came to realize why business was slow.

After a few hours of standing on his corner, Ordonez realized why he was getting fewer costumers than expected. Many of the parade-goers were observant Jews coming to support the Israeli Day Parade, and they don’t eat non-kosher hotdogs.

Israeli Spectator Wonders Why Thousands Here Saluting Her Country

05/25/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

The young woman walking along Fifth Avenue seemed confused. She was from a small country thousands of miles away, yet saw throngs of people in matching T-shirts waving her country’s flag and singing in her native language.

She hesitantly approached us as we stood on the sidewalk, watching the May 23 Salute to Israel Parade. “Excuse me,” she said, in an accent that was clearly Israeli. “Why is everyone walking down the street carrying Israeli flags?”

African-Americans Express Empathy For Israel

05/25/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

The annual Israeli Day Parade was not just for about the Jewish community. The African-American community was well represented on Sunday by parade marchers and curbside supporters.

Bright Flight

Israel’s brain power is increasingly global and mobile, and the country is moving to keep academics at home.

Special To The Jewish Week
05/12/2010

T el Aviv — Israeli Science Minister Daniel Hershkowitz announced recently that the country was unintentionally subsidizing the entire Western world to the tune of some $3 billion with its exported brain power. 

“We have one tremendous resource and that’s our human capital,” Hershkowitz told a recent conference on education, basing his estimate on the amount Israel invests in training its academics, thousands of whom are working abroad. “But we are bearing witness to brain drain abroad.” 

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How The Other 20 Percent Lives

Israeli Arabs say the country under-serves
their community, and underestimates its value.

Staff WriterIsrael Correspondent
05/12/2010

F lag Season is the time in the spring when Israelis remember victims of the Holocaust and military battles and terror attacks by standing in silence while sirens wail around the country. 

For the vast majority of Israeli Jews, it’s a time of somber remembrance and national pride, flags, and barbecues in the park. A period of reflection cushioned by the reality of having a Jewish homeland. 

For Arab Israelis, flag season conjures mixed emotions. Michele Chabin
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