Special Sections

Cuts Could Hit Autism Programs

Staff Writer
05/05/2010

 UJA-Federation of New York officials and those at some of the agencies it funds are bracing for city and state budget cuts to programs that help young people with autism make the transition into adulthood.

In New York City alone, 25 agencies that serve the autistic community — eight of which are affiliated with UJA-Federation — are in jeopardy of losing $1.5 million in funding from the “One Out of 150” initiative,

Shining A Light On Older Teens With Autism

Conference focuses on underserved population as they make
the tough transition to adulthood.

Staff Writer
05/05/2010

 

 

 

In the last 10 or so years, autism has exploded into the national consciousness. For parents with young children, the terms “autism spectrum disorder” and Asperger’s
syndrome have become part of a new vocabulary to describe children who seem
withdrawn, uncommunicative, anti-social or slow to pick up on social cues.
 

Dr. Fred Volkmar discussed the challenges in working with young adults with autism at recent conference here. Michael Fine/UJA-F

One Mother’s Mission To Fight Rare Disease

Staff Writer
05/05/2010

 Gila Michael used to sell real estate to celebrities and vent frustrations about her personal life on the pages of a yet-to-be published memoir, which she’s titled, “Lovesick in Beverly Hills.” Then one day four years ago, her life turned upside down. 

Gila Michael: Spurred by daughter’s rare hereditary muscle disorder.

New Focus On Genetic Screening For Persians

Two research projects, new organization raising awareness
in Iranian communities here and in L.A..

Special To The Jewish Week
05/05/2010

 If you’re an Ashkenazi Jewish woman, a standard prenatal visit to the obstetrician includes testing for as many as 15 hereditary diseases that could affect your offspring. Insurance covers the cost. If you’re a Persian Jewish woman, and you want to be tested for the assortment of genetic mutations commonly found in the Iranian Jewish community, you’re basically out of luck. And quite likely, you’re also out of pocket, paying with your own money for each individual test.

Dr. David Rimoin and his research partner developed the West Coast study that screened 1000 Persian Jews.

The Guidelines Wars

Staff Writer
05/05/2010

 What follows are the key points among recommendations issued last fall by the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force. It should be noted that the Task Force recommends these guidelines to women without an increased risk of breast cancer, due to prior illness or family history. Also listed are the more widely accepted guidelines.

1 No mammograms in women under the age of 50. 

2. At age 50, begin biennial screening.

3. Don’t teach self exams.

More Widely Accepted Guidelines 

1. Begin annual mammograms at age 40.

Relaxed Breast Cancer Guidelines Criticized In Community

Gap years in new government rules seen as particular concern for Jewish women.

Special To The Jewish Week
05/05/2010

 Mention the new breast cancer guidelines, and D.J. Schneider Jensen utters a single syllable of disgust. “Uhk!” Like many Jewish women who carry a BRCA genetic mutation or have a personal history of breast cancer, Jensen was appalled by controversial recommendations issued five months ago by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. The new guidelines advise against mammograms until the age of 50, and against teaching self breast exams to women

Rochelle Shoretz, a breast cancer survivor who founded the Sharsheret advocacy organization.

Q & A: Soul Of A Doctor Telling Rick Hodes’ story.

Staff Writer
05/05/2010

 In “This is a Soul: The Mission of Rick Hodes,” Marilyn Berger, veteran journalist and the widow of “60 Minutes’” Don Hewitt, tells the story of the Long Island-born, ba’al teshuva physician who has spent two decades treating poverty-stricken patients in Ethiopia and traveling to the sites of famines and various disasters. Last year she went to Ethiopia to see Hodes in action, spending Shabbat meals with him and his extended Ethiopian family. 

 

Gaucher’s Link To Parkinson’s

Staff Writer
05/05/2010

Researchers have been trying for decades to determine genetic or environmental causes of Parkinson’s disease. They have explored consumption of traces of aluminum in food, environmental toxins such as carbon monoxide and some pesticides and even head trauma.

Dr. Ellen Sidransky: Organized study finding connection between Gaucher’s disease and Parkinson’s.

Healthcare May 2010

The Genetics Issue: New screening for Persians, The Gaucher's-Parkinson's Connection, childhood obesity in Israel and more.

05/05/2010
Healthcare May 2010

Slow Cooked Through the Ages

The story of cholent goes to the heart of Jewish history and tradition.

Special to the Jewish Week
04/28/2010

The origins of cholent, the thick, slow-cooked savory Shabbat stew, the traditional Sabbath midday meal, go all the way back to the time of the Talmud. Indeed, its history takes it on a route so dispersed across centuries and cultures throughout the diaspora, that in different countries it’s alternatively known as hamin (Aramaic for warm, Hebrew for hot); or dafina or adafina (Arabic for “covered”). There are even variants in its Yiddish name, whether schalet in the Yiddish of Germany or shulet in the Yiddish of Eastern Europe.

PHOTO: American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee. Baking challah for Shabbat at the Immouzer camp.
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