Special Sections

Text Context September 2011

Glass half-empty or half-full? This month, as the New Year begins, we take a look at the optimistic side of life, from many Jewish perspectives.
10/03/2011 - 20:00
Text Context September 2011

Magic Down Under

The Soreq Cave near Beit Shemesh features some of the richest ancient limestone formations anywhere.
Israel Correspondent
09/14/2011 - 20:00

On a warm September day, four elderly Druze women in black dresses and sheer white headscarves sat under a shady canopy and poured a sweet liquid from the tea pots they had brought with them from the Golan Heights to central Israel.

While they had their repast al fresco, the younger women in their group descended the 150 stairs leading to the Soreq Cave (which has another 140 stairs), one of the most remarkable sites in Israel.

Good to the last drop: Stalactites and stalagmites, formed by acidic rainwater that dissolves limestone, make Soreq Cave

Israel Travel September 2011

Stepping Into The Past (And Present) The grottoes of Rosh Hanikra, the Soreq Cave ... and The mirco-breweries of Tel Aviv.
09/14/2011 - 20:00
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Look North

Off the beaten path, Western Galilee’s tourist sites offer a rich experience.
Special To The Jewish Week
09/14/2011 - 20:00

While most visitors to Israel opt for the conventional tourist route — spending time in the spiritual and religious Jewish capital Jerusalem or enjoying the upbeat tempo of Tel Aviv and its beach —fewer people chose to make the trip up north in order to explore the delights of the Western Galilee, where the sites are certainly subtler but no less rich.

Northern exposure: The Acco waterfront, left, and the ancient Yechi’am Fortress.

Hotels Are All Business These Days

Israeli hoteliers upgrading their services to meet growing business travel demand.
Special To The Jewish Week
09/13/2011 - 20:00

Business over family — at least for now. That’s the mantra of Israeli hoteliers these days as they pivot to upgrade their services for business executives who are looking to mix business with pleasure in the Jewish state.

The reasons? Israel’s high-tech sector, which has weathered the global economic downturn better than many countries, and the growing number of international business and Jewish organizational events that are now being held in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.

Magic Down Under

The Soreq Cave near Beit Shemesh features some of the richest ancient limestone formations anywhere.
Israel Correspondent
09/12/2011 - 20:00

 On a warm September day, four elderly Druze women in black dresses and sheer white headscarves sat under a shady canopy and poured a sweet liquid from the tea pots they had brought with them from the Golan Heights to central Israel.

While they had their repast al fresco, the younger women in their group descended the 150 stairs leading to the Soreq Cave (which has another 140 stairs), one of the most remarkable sites in Israel.

Good to the last drop: Stalactites and stalagmites, formed by acidic rainwater that dissolves limestone, make Israel’s Soreq Cav

An Ale Of A Trend

American immigrants fire up Israel’s burgeoning micro-brewery industry.
Special to The Jewish Week
09/12/2011 - 20:00

They gave it all up for a nice, hand-crafted cold one. It would be almost impossible to believe that an inventive Washington, D.C., caterer who created culinary events for both Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, an NYU-trained lawyer cum high-tech maven and a successful New Jersey accountant would actually chuck their lucrative careers in order to serve up boutique beers to thirsty Israelis and curious tourists in metro Tel Aviv.

The scene at Jem’s Beer Factory in Petach Tikva.

Books

09/05/2011 - 20:00

Books about Israel and Israelis, including new books by Amos Oz, Meir Shalev and Aharon Appelfeld, dominate publishers’ fall lists. There are biographies of David Ben Gurion and Ariel Sharon and others who created, dominated, destroyed and developed the city of Jerusalem; and there’s a lyrical memoir of about life between Israel and America. Along with debut books and highly anticipated works by established authors, the season’s new titles also include tales of love, family, and still untold stories of the Holocaust.

FICTION

A fall sampler: Israel figures prominently in the new publishing season, Aharon Applefeld novel and biographies of Ariel Sharon

MUSEUMS/GALLERIES LIST

09/05/2011 - 20:00

“Prophecy of Place: Quintan Ana Wikswo.” The multi-disciplinary artist Quintan Ana Wikswo created the monumental series, “Prophecy of Place,” as a kind of momento mori for lost Jewish life. Through photographic collages, poetry and video, the artist has created various works inspired by Jewish communities from South America to Russia, from the 13th century and to the last century. Yeshiva University Museum at the Center for Jewish History, through Feb. 14, 2012. (212) 294-8330

From “The Snowy Days and the Art of Ezra Jack Keats.” Ezra Jack Keats Foundation

‘The Radical Camera: New York’s Photo League, 1936-1951’

At The Jewish Museum
09/05/2011 - 20:00

With 150 photographs from such luminaries as Paul Strand, Weegee and Lisette Model, The Jewish Museum will soon host one of the most impressive exhibits of urban photography in history. The exhibit focuses on photographers who were associated with The Photo League, a radical collective that housed a school, a darkroom, a gallery and a salon in Manhattan between 1936 and 1951, and was, above all, driven by a deep social consciousness as well as a refined appreciation of art.

Clockwise from top: The evocative work of Alexander Alland, Sid Grossman, Rebecca Lepkoff and Bernard Cole.
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