Special Sections

Editor’s Note

Jewish Week Book Critic
04/28/2010

 Chrystie Sherman took the cover photograph, “Shabbat,” in Bukhara, Uzbekistan, in 2002, as part of her “Lost Futures: Journeys into the Jewish Diaspora” project.  Her subject, dressed in a brocade Shabbat robe, opened the door of her family’s home to the photographer shortly before the onset of Shabbat. Later that evening, she hosted Sherman and 10 other guests for a traditional Bukharan Shabbat dinner of fragrant rice and lamb, in their courtyard under the stars. The young woman resembles the Sabbath bride of song.

lighting Shabbat candles at a DC-supported home for the aged for survivors of German concentration camps. Nice, France, 1951

Text Context April 2010: Shabbat

This month, our distinguished writers pause to consider the Sabbath, a day said to mirror the world to come.

Staff Writer
04/28/2010
cover.gif

Bauhaus Is Our House

05/22/2009
Staff Writer

Cream-colored stone apartment buildings line nearly every street in central Tel Aviv, each varying slightly in shape and size but adhering to a loosely defined style of openness and movement that is particular to Israel’s “White City.” (In 2003, the area was designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.)

A tour of the distinctive architectural style that helps define the Tel Aviv look.

The Health Burden Of The Survivors

Study reveals that those who went through the Holocaust are more likely to get cancer than European Jews who didn’t.

02/05/2010
Staff Writer

For Jews who escaped Europe during the Holocaust and settled in Israel, the Jewish state really was a kind of Promised Land. Yet from a health perspective, the young country couldn’t immunize them from the physical and mental burdens they carried with them.

In fact, Europeans who immigrated to Israel after the Holocaust were 2.4 times more likely to develop cancer than those who arrived before the war, according to a recent study published in Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Yom HaShoah: The Gift of Food

When a Manhattan survivor takes to the kitchen, her dishes nourish far more than herself alone

Special to the Jewish Week
04/15/2010

The elevator door opens on the 12th floor and I inhale the heady scent of sautéed onions. I don’t have to wonder where the smell is coming from, I know: Eva is cooking.

From the first day that my husband and I moved into our East Side Manhattan apartment, we were greeted with the intoxicating food scents wafting through the door of my neighbor Eva’s apartment, just down the hall.

I ran into her in the corridor one day and told her how enchanted I was by the smell of her cooking.

The bread of affection: Eva Young at work in her kitchen.

Yom HaShoah 2010: The Cello, The Dress And The Autograph Book

Three new books explore the Holocaust through the prism of everyday objects

Jewish Week Book Critic
04/15/2010

Mundane objects can be the containers of powerful stories. Those objects take on a degree of holiness when they are infused with memory and loss, and are the only tangible connection to lives and times that are no more.

Three new books related to the dark history of the Holocaust, are connected to objects that have become priceless and symbolic: a cello, a child’s dress and an autograph book.

Time was out of the hands of labor camp inmates, but celloist Lev Aronson kept a life-saving beat in his head.

Yom HaShoah: Remembering the Wrong Thing

The new obsession with Jewish vengeance, and what it suggests.

Special to the Jewish Week
04/15/2010

In the topsy-turvy post-Holocaust world, genocide never ended and the Holocaust itself became a brand name. Yom HaShoah competed with Yom Kippur for mourners. A museum in Washington, D.C., doubled as a Jewish Mount Rushmore. And Anne Frank was adopted by every culture on earth as a metaphor for adolescence interrupted. Elie Wiesel, a precocious, sensitive boy from a remote region of Transylvania, ended up as a Nobel laureate, a worldwide celebrity, and an honored guest on “Oprah.”

Who would have imagined all that when the death camps were liberated in 1945?

Revisionist history obscuring truth? Brad Pitt as Nazi hunter Lt. Aldo Raine in “Inglourious Basterds.”

Yom HaShoah 2010

For Survivors Here, Waning Years Are Trying. Many are living in poverty, largely hidden from public view; new German payments for homecare seen helping

Staff Writer
04/15/2010

On the streets of Jerusalem, their plight is well chronicled, and even debated in the corridors of power in the Knesset. It is a well-told story across Eastern Europe and in the former Soviet Union, too, where a frayed social safety net affords little protection.

Holiday celebrations are a popular event for Holocaust survivors at the Jewish Community Council of Washington Heights-Inwood.

Keeping Pace With Nature's Fury

As a succession of disasters strike, Jewish relief organizations struggle to raise enough funds to respond.

09/12/2008
Editorial Intern

Almost four years after the 2004 tsunami in South Asia, one of the deadliest natural disasters in history, relief and rebuilding efforts in the affected areas are far from over.
But in the years since, disasters and crises in other areas of the world have also demanded attention and humanitarian aid, including the cyclone in Burma and the earthquake in Sichuan, China, both of which hit in May of this year, and more recently the war in South Ossetia, Georgia. Add to that the damage on U.S. soil from a succession of tropical storms and hurricanes.

Kosher Food Going Natural

New Emphasis on low-fat, low-carb, organic fare sweeping through industry.

02/05/2010
Editorial Intern

Traditional Jewish food — six-inch-high, artery-clogging corned-beef sandwiches, cholesterol-high cholent with kishke and chicken soup
flavored with fatty schmaltz — isn’t quite in line with a healthy, balanced diet.
But with American’s growing obsession with healthy foods, and organic products — the organic industry grew from $1 billion in 1990 to over $23 billion today — kosher producers are offering more wholesome and beneficial products, and health food producers are gaining kosher certification.

Juices from Organic Avenue — like apple, carrot, cucumber and grapefruit — are an integral part of the raw food experience.
Syndicate content