News

Breaking The Munich Silence

03/31/2006
Staff Writer
New Haven, Conn. Dan Alon can give two reasons why for 34 years he never spoke about the 1972 Summer Olympics at Munich, where 11 members of the Israeli delegation were killed by Palestinian terrorists, where he was an athlete on the Israeli team, where he was among five Israelis who escaped by jumping to safety off a balcony in the Olympic Village. First, no one asked. "Nobody was interested in what happened to us, the survivors," he said. "The media was concerned about the people who died, about the terrorists, about the Mossad."

Dancing Into Spring

03/31/2006
Staff Writer
They were dancing across from Lincoln Center this week. Nearly 400 amateur Israeli folk dancers from all over the United States. And about 1,000 spectators, who took their turn on the dance floor (an exhibition hall set up for an Israeli vendors' fair) before the 55th annual Israel Folk Dance Festival and Festival of the Arts on Sunday in the auditorium of the Martin Luther King Jr. High School.

Different Kind Of Passover

03/24/2006
Staff Writer
Come this time of year, Jewish thoughts turn to the ancient Hebrews' rescue from slavery and Passover traditions.

An Ethiopian Pen Pal

03/24/2006
Staff Writer
This bat mitzvah girl isn't getting pens as gifts. She's giving them away: to strangers in Ethiopia.

Preserving The Lodz Legacy

03/24/2006
Staff Writer
A few thousand high school and university students, joined by politicians, participated Tuesday in an annual International Day of Racism in Lodz, a large Polish city in the center of the country. They listened to lectures, attended concerts and visited houses of worship. Joanna Podolska wasn't among them. Podolska, a Lodz journalist who helped found the Institute of Tolerance that organizes the U.N.-initiated pluralism activities there, missed the event for the first time in its five years: she was in the United States doing research on the Jewish history Lodz.

Polish Jewry’s New Independence

04/30/2008
Staff Writer
Warsaw — Since he first came here from Israel 14 years ago to help rebuild Jewish life here in the Polish capital, Yossi Erez has threatened that his retirement, and his return to Israel, was imminent. A Polish-born Jew who made aliyah with his family in 1947 and served as an Israeli Army psychiatrist, Erez served as the Polish representative of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, training young community leaders and coordinating educational programs and waiting until he wasn’t needed on a daily basis anymore. That day came two weeks ago.

Mixed Record On Return Of Property

04/30/2008
Staff Writer
Lublin, Poland — On the first two nights of Passover, the ground floor of a former medical academy near Lublin’s historic Old City was crowded by early evening with members of the Jewish community. Children played for hours in the hallways while senior citizens schmoozed in a small office. After sundown, joined by other members of the community and a Jewish choir from Warsaw, they filed into a social hall for the seders; afterward, they stayed to play and shmooze some more.

Longtime Cuban Jewish Leader Dies At 80

03/17/2006
Staff Writer
Dr. Jose Miller, a physician who served as president of Cuba's Jewish community for two decades and shepherded a revival in the country's Jewish life, died Feb. 27 in Havana after a brief illness. He was 80. Dr. Miller's years of leadership coincided with the government's decision in the early 1990s to change its character from atheistic to secular, eliminating the persecution of people who participated in religious activities and allowing the open practice of Judaism and other faiths.

Up To The Challenge

03/10/2006
Staff Writer
Three days after the Olympic torch in the center of Turin was extinguished last week, marking the end of the XX Winter Olympics, another Olympic torch relay began in the streets of Italy. This torch is part of the Paralympics (the "parallel Olympics" for the physically challenged) that will be held in Turin and the nearby Alps March 10-19. The Paralympics, a 56-year-old sporting institution, at first glance are not a Jewish event; few of this year's participating athletes are known to be Jewish.

Operation Bat Mitzvah

03/10/2006
Staff Writer
First came the date for the bat mitzvah. Marcy Marbut and her parents picked that out three years ago. Then the invitations. They were mailed out a month and a half ago. And there was the bat mitzvah tutor, the party planner, the outfit for the simcha and other details. "This was very organized: everything was planned," Marcy said. "The only thing I didn't plan on was getting sick." The snag: a ruptured appendix.
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