News

For Leviev, All That Glitters Isn’t Gold

02/21/2008 - 19:00
Special to The Jewish Week

 

Perhaps he should have stayed behind the scenes.

Ever since billionaire diamond and real estate magnate Lev Leviev began to raise his profile and personalize his brand with the opening of deluxe diamond shops in London in 2006 and here in 2007, the 51-year-old Uzbekistan-born tycoon has run into a sustained string of bad news and adverse publicity. Even a hagiographic profile in The New York Times Magazine last September — in which he revealed a secret desire to become prime minister of Israel within 10 years — seems not to have helped.

Toward A Kinder, Gentler Islam

02/21/2008 - 19:00
Special to The Jewish Week

 Is there a tolerant, pluralistic form of Islam that has the self-confidence and mass appeal to counter the spread of violent and fundamentalist jihadist ideology across the Muslim world?  

C. Holland Taylor, a North Carolina-born ex-businessman who was born Christian but terms himself a “universalist drawn to mystical traditions in all religions,” thinks so.

An Independent Press?

12/23/2004 - 19:00
Special to The Jewish Week

Has a Russian-language newspaper in America known for its assertive stand for a Russian-American Jewish community independent of influence back home fallen under the sway of Moscow?Some in the Russian-speaking world are asking this question six weeks after the Russian Forward, the well-regarded weekly newspaper, was sold to local businessmen and Jewish organizational leaders known collectively as the Mitzvah Media Group.While the founders of Mitzvah Media — Dr. Igor Branovan, Dr.

Fit And Frum

07/13/2006 - 20:00
Staff Writer
For a yeshiva graduate from Brooklyn, a mile swim, a 24-mile bike ride and a six-mile run — all in one day — began with a single question. Last year, after David Shaoul had run a 10-kilometer race in Central Park and the New York City Marathon, both on a co-worker’s challenge after a decade-plus of athletic inactivity, he asked himself, “What’s the next thing?” His answer was the triathlon, an Olympic-sanctioned sport that combines long-distance swimming, biking and running, all done consecutively.

L.I. Synagogue Zoning Controversy Continues

02/22/2007 - 19:00
Staff Writer
A state court has cast a cloud on Chabad of Southampton’s synagogue. State Supreme Court Justice Thomas F. Whelan ruled last week in favor of attorneys for neighbors who contended that the Southampton Zoning Board of Appeals did not follow proper procedure when it granted Chabad the variances it needed to operate a synagogue in a converted private home at 214 Hill St.

Liberalism Still Rules

11/17/2005 - 19:00
Staff Writer
If American Jews are tacking to the right, nobody told them. That is the finding of a national public opinion study released last week. According to the National Survey on Race Relations and Changing Ethnic Demographics in the United States of America, commissioned by the New York-based Foundation for Ethnic Understanding, Jews in this country align themselves more with African-Americans on attitudes toward race and poverty, and with Hispanic-Americans on attitudes about immigration, than do other whites.

ORT Network In Chaos

01/11/2007 - 19:00
Staff Writer
The worldwide organization that runs an independent school system for more than 90,000 students in Israel has been thrown into chaos amid charges of a lack of financial transparency, slander and turf warfare, The Jewish Week has learned. Millions of dollars are at stake in the battle that pits World ORT against ORT Israel, which has just broken away from its parent body. Caught in the fray is ORT America, which is charging that ORT Israel is perched to pounce on its American donors.

Casting Off Tashlich

09/16/1999 - 20:00
Staff Writer
On Rosh HaShanah, Jews usually go to a nearby body of water for tashlich, turn to the heavens and symbolically cast away their sins. This year some Jews looked to the skies first and stayed home.

‘Phantom Rule’ May Have Limited Holocaust-Era Awards To Claimants

06/28/2007 - 20:00
Staff Writer
When a commission investigating Holocaust-era life insurance policies ended its work in March after nine years, it boasted that it had awarded more than $300 million to survivors and their heirs. Now, a former commission arbitrator is criticizing the group’s work, alleging that a “phantom rule” was used by some of the dozens of arbitrators, accounting in part for the denial of 84 percent of all claims filed. The arbitrator, Albert B. Lewis, who is also a former New York State insurance superintendent, is calling for a reopening of these cases.

Two Days Of Solidarity

04/03/2003 - 19:00
Staff Writer
David Eric Borowitz was introduced to gas masks when he led a delegation of students from Yeshiva University and Stern College to Israel on the eve of the Gulf War 12 years ago. "I had hoped the last gas mask I'd ever see was in 1991," he said. Last week he saw the gas masks again. "They were waiting for us on the seats": of the bus that carried Borowitz and 34 others in a hastily arrived Action of Unity solidarity mission from Ben-Gurion Airport to their hotel in Jerusalem.
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