News

Honoring A Heroine Of The Shoah

08/25/2006
Staff Writer
Clara Baer was 19 when the Nazis invaded Budapest in 1944, bringing the Final Solution to Hungary. She joined her parents, devout Catholics, in rescuing Jews, giving them refuge in the family’s home and a nearby textile factory. She was 81 when Israel honored her for her heroism last week.

Time To Move On

08/25/2006
Staff Writer
The New Orleans Jewish community, along with the other residents of the city battered by Katrina a year ago, will mark the first anniversary of the deadly storm on Tuesday. But Adam Bronstone, who became the voice and public face of New Orleans Jewry in the months after the hurricane, won’t be there. Bronstone, community relations consultant for the Jewish Federation of Greater New Orleans, started a similar job with the United Jewish Community of Broward County, in Florida, last month. He says he has no special plans for Tuesday.

Katrina The Shadchan

08/25/2006
Staff Writer
Parksville, N.Y. In the chasidic world, matchmakers bring young men and women together. In the case of Rabbi Mendy and Rachel Traxler, the shadchan was Katrina. Mendy, 22, part of the Chabad-Lubavitch rescue-and-relief effort in Baton Rouge following the hurricane a year ago, traveled to Houston to join his parents, Chabad emissaries there, for the High Holy Days season. Rachel Kaufmann, also 22, was in Houston with her family, also Chabad shluchim, who left their home in New Orleans for temporary accommodations in Houston.

A Texas Welcome

08/25/2006
Staff Writer
Houston Like most of the New Orleans residents who came here a year ago to escape the ravages of Katrina, James Hardy and his wife Dr. Nancy Forrest Hardy thought they’d be here only a few days. When they packed their Ford Explorer outside the couple’s apartment in the French Quarter, they “literally took a couple changes of clothes, a couple bottles of water, some canned food,” James says. Unlike most of the evacuees, they stayed here.

‘On Pins And Needles’

08/25/2006
Staff Writer
Weather permitting, the Jews of New Orleans will participate in what has become a rare event on Rosh HaShanah this year — High Holy Day services in their own synagogues. The last two years, the weather didn’t permit. Last year, it was Katrina. New Orleans evacuated on the eve of the High Holy Days. The year before, Ivan. Ditto. This year, a Jewish community that has returned home in smaller numbers from points around the United States is preparing for the New Year with an eye on the weather forecast.

The War, At Makor

08/11/2006
Staff Writer
A green hatchet, some red Cedars of Lebanon, some poetry, some cartoons, some photographs, some blog journals printed out on pink sheets of paper. In the weeks since the war in Lebanon began, a wide variety of artistic and non-artistic types have expressed their feelings about the fighting — and the 92nd Street Y’s Makor Gallery on the Upper West Side has put many of their expressions in 8-by-10-inch wooden frames and hung them in a public display.

Katyushas: Going Once, Going Twice

08/11/2006
Staff Writer
How much would you pay for a few shards of twisted steel or some quarter-inch-diameter steel balls? If the metal items are the remnants of Katyusha rockets fired at Israel in recent weeks, the going rate is at least $52 and $24.99, respectively. Those were the high bids offered, as of early this week, by potential customers on the Internet eBay.com auction site.

Schumer Urges Repairs To Jewish Cemeteries

08/04/2006
Staff Writer
Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) in a letter sent last week to Romanian President Traian Basescu urged Romania to restore and protect the country’s Jewish cemeteries, which fell into disrepair during the communist era. “Cemeteries are an important issue to worldwide Jewry, and Jewish cemeteries are no exception,” Schumer wrote. “For many Jews in the United States these cemeteries are the last link to their ancestry.”

A Banner Day At City Hall

08/04/2006
Staff Writer
The flag in the background with the sky-blue stripes and Magen David, now torn and battered and stained, once flew in Lower Manhattan. The Israeli flag was among the banners of several nations that hung in the entrance of one of the World Trade Center buildings, representing countries that had commercial interests in the landmark skyscrapers.

The Stubble Of Remembrance

08/04/2006
Staff Writer
I hadn’t seen Nissim, owner of my favorite kosher restaurant in my Queens neighborhood, for a while, but he saw something new on me right away. “That’s one of those Three Weeks things, right?” he said, pointing to my face with a note of concern. It had sprouted a growth of unkempt, untrimmed beard since I last had sampled his steamed dumplings and egg roll.
Syndicate content