News

Marlene Adler Marks, Columnist

09/13/2002
Staff Writer
Marlene Adler Marks, a columnist for the Jewish Journal in Los Angeles who gave a Jewish spin to such topics as politics and personal relationships, and finally to her battle with lung cancer, died last week at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. She was 54. A New York native, she began writing her column, "A Woman's Voice," about the death of her husband when she was named managing editor of the Jewish Journal in 1987. Over the years, her column became a fixture in the Los Angeles Jewish community.

Pitching Away Their Sins

09/13/2002
Staff Writer
It was a cast of thousands: of breadcrumbs. On Monday, the day after Rosh HaShanah, a few hundred Jews came from Lower Manhattan to perform the ancient ritual of tashlich. The name means "thou shalt cast," referring to the small pieces of bread or objects that are shaken from one's pockets and thrown onto a body of water, symbolizing the discarding of one's sins. This year the location was symbolic too: the Hudson River behind the Museum of Jewish Heritage-A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, the site nearest to the destroyed World Trade Center.

Lessons In Security

09/06/2002
Staff Writer
Ah, the memories of the first day of school. New classes. New friends. New security searches. In Israel, ever more security-conscious because of ongoing Arab terrorism, lines of students waiting to go through metal detectors at the school's front door offer a vivid lesson in current events. Many schools have hired private security guards, aware that perpetrators of the intifada seek out crowded places for their attacks. Here, students enter their school in Ramla, where Prime Minister Ariel Sharon came to mark the beginning of the school year.

Pride And Prejudice

06/11/2008
Staff Writer
Each year for the last decade Tel Aviv’s Gay Pride Parade has marched through the streets of the Mediterranean-side city. Last week, for the first time, it began at a new municipal center for Israel’s homosexual community.

A Day For Lamentations

09/06/2002
Staff Writer
Two days after Rosh HaShanah this year comes another Yom HaZikaron. The first anniversary of the attack on America occurs during the Jewish Days of Repentance (the Jewish New Year is traditionally referred to by its Hebrew name, the day of memorial) and the Jewish community will join all Americans in honoring the memory of the 3,000 victims of Sept. 11, 2001.

Batting 1.000 For Shabbat

08/30/2002
Staff Writer
Do you know what time Shabbat ended in Williamsport, Pa., last week? You did if you were watching ESPN. The cable sports channel was broadcasting a semifinal game in the Little League World Series, and 12-year-old Micah Golshirazian was sitting in the dugout of the Jesse Burkett All-Stars (New England champions from Worcester, Mass.) and as a Sabbath-observant player, he wouldn't play until Shabbat was over. At 8:43 p.m. A clock on ESPN counted down the minutes. In the dugout, Micah watched a scoreboard clock.

Net Gain For Tolerance

08/30/2002
Staff Writer
Amir Hadad wasn't courting symbolism. Hadad, a 24-year-old-professional tennis player from Israel, tells The Jewish Week he became the partner of Pakistan's Aisam ul-Haq Qureshi in time for doubles play at the Wimbledon tournament in London in July for financial reasons. "We just wanted to make some money," says Hadad, who lost his singles match in the qualifying round of the U.S. Open that began this week in Flushing, Queens, and was to be teamed again with Qureshi in doubles. They made it to the third round at Wimbledon.

A Scroll For NYC

08/23/2002
Staff Writer
On his first visit to New York City after the Sept. 11 attacks a year ago, Rabbi Boruch Shlomo Cunin, from Los Angeles, was talking with some fellow Lubavitchers about a Jewish response to terrorism. "What would the rebbe do?" one of the chasidim asked, referring to the late Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, leader of the Chabad movement. "The rebbe would give New York City a gift," was the answer.

Falash Mura Funds Dry Up

06/04/2008
Staff Writer
The fate of the fenced-in compound in northern Ethiopia that serves as the central feeding and education location for thousands of Falash Mura awaiting immigration to Israel is now likely in the hands of local Jewish federations. This follows the recent decision of the United Jewish Communities to halt its financial support of the programs, which became effective last week. The compound will have to curtail many of its activities to forestall closing the entire site, in Gondar, according to spokesmen for the North American Conference on Ethiopian Jewry.

On Top Of The World

06/04/2008
Staff Writer
If only the Barts had scaled Mount Everest on the High Holy Days. Instead, the mother (Cheryl) and daughter (Nikki) from Sydney, Australia, were on the world’s highest mountain during Passover, part of a two-month expedition on which they reached the summit last week and made history. They became the first mother-daughter team to scale 29,035-foot-high Mount Everest, as well as the tallest peak on all seven continents.
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