News

Standing Up For Pesach

04/16/2008
Staff Writer
Passover or tennis? Passover or politics? Passover or crustaceans? Members of the Jewish community are this year facing — and in increasing numbers, protesting — the need to make such choices at Passover. Newspaper and Web sites around the country have reported a wide range of conflicts for Jews who wish to observe the holiday, which coincides with events scheduled in apparent disregard for the Jewish calendar. This year, the Jewish community is fighting back.

Keeping Up A Neighborhood Tradition

04/16/2008
Staff Writer
The customers of Aron Streit Inc., a New York City fixture for kosher-for-Passover matzah and other holiday food items since 1925, have one wish during this shopping season: Next year on the Lower East Side. The bakery and retail store at the corner of Rivington and Suffolk streets, the neighborhood’s last family-owned matzah-making facility, recently went on the market for $25 million.

Double His Pleasure

07/14/2006
Staff Writer
Andy Ram, a native of Uruguay, calls himself “a huge soccer fan.” But he was on an airplane during the World Cup final on Sunday, unable to watch Italy’s victory over France. “I had the best excuse,” he said — he had made history the previous night. Ram, 26, teamed with Vera Zvonareva of the Czech Republic to win the mixed doubles finals at Wimbledon, in England. His win marked the first by an Israeli in a tennis Grand Slam tournament.

Inside ‘Hidden America’

07/07/2006
Staff Writer
In Florida she attended a Sunday morning church service, among more than 5,000 Christian worshippers, which featured rock music and strobe lights. In Texas she went to a Ten Commandments rally at the state house, where Evangelical Christians were urged to put God back into government. Back in Florida, in a soaring cathedral, with a Christian flag flying outside, she heard speakers laud the virtues of creationism. Michelle Goldberg’s year of living Christianly was done for journalistic, not theological purposes.

Is Hall Of Fame In The Cards?

07/07/2006
Staff Writer
A century after he was a standout major league baseball catcher, Johnny Kling has been bypassed by the national pastime. When the Veterans Committee of baseball’s Hall of Fame made its last choices for long-retired players, in 2001, Kling did not make the cut. When Jewish Major Leaguers issued its initial set of Jewish baseball cards in 2003, and an updated version earlier this year, Kling wasn’t there. Was it because Kling, who died at 71 in 1947, was too Jewish, or not Jewish enough? Gil Bogen says it’s both.

Mourning A Lost Son Of Israel

07/07/2006
Staff Writer
This past week, while Israel prayed for a kidnapped Israeli corporal and Israeli soldiers struck at Gaza, a future Israeli soldier was buried in Jerusalem.

Abduction As A Weapon

06/30/2006
Staff Writer
As far back as the Munich Olympics of 1972, Palestinian terrorists and their supporters have used kidnapping as a political tool, abducting Israeli civilians and soldiers to be used in potential prisoner swaps and to obtain other concessions from Israel. Following is a chronology of prominent Israeli kidnappings and MIA cases: 1972: Members of the Black September terrorist group sneak into the Olympic Village in Munich and take 11 members of the Israeli delegation hostage. All 11 are killed.

A Road That Divides A Nation

08/17/2007
Staff Writer
In most countries, a new highway is just a stretch of asphalt. In Israel, a new highway is a source of national debate. Israel is building a unique four-lane highway through the West Bank, east of Jerusalem — two lanes are for Israelis, two for Palestinians. Separated by a tall wall of concrete that looks like Jerusalem stone, the nearly completed road will keep the nationalities separate from each other, allowing Palestinians to travel through Israeli-held land with few exits along the way.

Holding Up Jewish Tradition

07/06/2007
Staff Writer
Somewhere, someone is holding a Torah scroll. Somewhere, a new parchment scroll is finding a new home. Somewhere, in other words, a Torah dedication ceremony is taking place. The participants, as in a religious neighborhood of Jerusalem, below, may wear black hats. Or, like Machinist’s Mate 3rd Class Jesse Kopelman, right, aboard the USS Harry S. Truman aircraft carrier in the Norfolk, Va., harbor, they may favor white caps.
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