News

Lipstadt’s Ward Churchill Moment

02/18/2005
Staff Writer
Deborah Lipstadt watched the television coverage the other day of Ward Churchill, the University of Colorado scholar under fire for calling the 9-11 victims “little Eichmanns,” and something seemed familiar. Churchill had compared Lipstadt, the Emory University professor of Jewish and Holocaust studies who won a 2002 libel suit brought by a British Holocaust denier, to Eichmann, an architect of the Final Solution.

Whiskey Rebellion

02/18/2005
Staff Writer
If you want to make a l’chaim at some major Orthodox synagogues around New York, you’ll have to wait until after services for kiddush. The shuls have banned kiddush clubs. This comes following the recent decision of the Orthodox Union’s board of directors to encourage its member congregations to discontinue the informal drinking clubs that draw congregants from Saturday morning during services.

QB Gets His Hall Pass

02/11/2005
Staff Writer
More than 70 years ago, a young quarterback named Benny Friedman was dubbed “the greatest football player in the world” by the renowned Daily News sportswriter Paul Gallico. Last week the Pro Football Hall of Fame certified that Friedman, who played for the New York Giants and three other NFL teams, ranks among the sport’s greats. On the eve of the Super Bowl, the hall announced that Friedman was among four 2005 inductees.

Cemetery Settlement Praised

01/28/2005
Staff Writer
The Westchester Jewish community this week praised a $100,000 settlement between a New Jersey real estate developer and the state attorney general that will create a memorial in Yonkers at the site of a shopping center garage built over an abandoned Jewish cemetery. According to the agreement announced Monday by Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, the state will use the settlement to erect a memorial to the Congregation of the People of Righteousness cemetery near the Costco and Home Depot along the state Thruway.

New Suit To Pressure Poles On Property

01/21/2005
Staff Writer
In a test case that will likely increase international pressure on Poland to return billions of dollars of property seized from Jews by the Nazis during World War II and nationalized by the communists after the war, a Polish-born Holocaust survivor is expected to file suit before the European Court of Human Rights in the next few weeks, The Jewish Week has learned. A New York-based not-for-profit law firm is preparing the case on behalf of Henryk Pikielny, who now lives in Paris.

Falash Mura Compound Reopens After Crisis

01/21/2005
Staff Writer
The fenced-in compound operated in Addis Ababa by a New York-based humanitarian organization to feed and educate Falash Mura has returned to its normal schedule after being closed for three weeks recently because of death threats against some of the Falash Mura leaders, according to officials of the North American Conference on Ethiopian Jewry. NACOEJ, which has conducted activities in Ethiopia for two decades, had shut the compound in the wake of accusations of abuse that appeared in the Israeli press and on Ethiopian television.

Back To Budapest

01/21/2005
Staff Writer
On a family vacation in Israel last year, the Silbermans of Bayside started discussing the forthcoming bat mitzvahs of twins Naomi and Giselle. They didn’t want a ceremony, a typical gaudy American-style ceremony, back in Queens. They ruled out Israel. Too traditional. Caryn Silberman, the girls’ mother, suggested Budapest — and the decision may have marked a first in post-Communist Budapest. Caryn, an attorney, and her husband George, a retired social worker, have roots in Hungary. The Silbermans had visited Budapest a few years earlier.

Easing The Fear Factor

01/21/2005
Staff Writer
The dozen American adults who participated in a recent weeklong tour of Israel sponsored by the Habonim Dror Zionist organization visited Jerusalem and Safed, viewed the Mediterranean from the heights of Haifa, ate a Bedouin-style meal and bathed in hot springs. But for most, the highlight was on the bus: the armed medic who accompanied the group and the tour guide’s Global Positioning Satellite device.

‘They’re Rebuilding Their Lives’

01/14/2005
Staff Writer
For most Americans, the familiar images of the towering tsunami tidal waves that destroyed large parts of Southeast Asia and took more than 150,000 lives two weeks ago are shattered villages and grieving relatives. For one American, a rabbi from Manhattan, who saw the wreckage with his own eyes, there is another memory: merchants still selling merchandise.

Out Of The Ashes

01/07/2005
Staff Writer
Some l’chaims. A few speeches. A little dancing. The ceremony for the opening of an afternoon drop-in center for Russian Jews yesterday at the Young Israel of Brighton Beach seemed ordinary. Only one thing was extraordinary. Chamah, the independent cultural and educational organization that is sponsoring the new Russian Club, suffered a fire that destroyed its international headquarters in Lower Manhattan barely two months ago.
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