News

Lieberman Dilemma Deepens For Obama, Jewish Groups

Even some American supporters of Lieberman, above, say his outspokenness could be a problem.

04/08/2009
Washington Correspondent

Next month’s expected Washington visit by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu could prove awkward for pro-Israel groups here and explosive for the Obama administration, largely because of the early bombshells dropped by his new foreign minister, Yisrael Beiteinu leader Avigdor Lieberman.

Days after taking office, Lieberman summarily discarded the results of the 2007 Annapolis peace conference and warned outsiders not to meddle in Israeli policy and politics.

Leaders Defend Embattled Holocaust Scholar

06/21/1998
Washington Correspondent

Washington — Holocaust scholars this week are rallying around the appointment of John K. Roth as the first director of the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, the newly created scholarly arm of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.
And museum officials seem to be lining up behind the embattled scholar.
Roth last week found himself under attack for a 1988 Los Angeles Times op-ed article that his attackers say “desecrates the memory” of Holocaust victims and compares Israel to the Nazis.

Holocaust Scholar Quits Under Fire

07/03/1998
Washington Correspondent

Washington — The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum has suffered another embarrassing public relations setback that supporters say could leave the institution more vulnerable to political control.John Roth, the Claremont McKenna College philosophy professor whose appointment as head of a new academic arm of the museum generated ferocious attacks from the right and unease among some mainstream Jewish leaders, stepped down Monday before assuming his duties.

Dissed! Dissed! Dissed Again!

06/23/2006
Staff Writer
Suddenly, it's open season on diaspora Jews. Jewish leaders had hardly recovered from a recent speech by Israeli writer A. B. Yehoshua dismissing them as irrelevant when they learned that Israel's Chief Rabbinate had put new hurdles in front of conversions performed by many American rabbis. Now, this week comes word that Israel's president, Moshe Katsav, is refusing to refer to the head of American Judaism's largest religious movement as "rabbi."

Grave Matters

06/16/2006
Staff Writer
The small Jewish cemetery in the Chelsea section of Manhattan, in the shadow of a century-old department store, is locked most of the time, visited only by prior appointment. A groundskeeper will be visiting the Congregation Shearith Israel Cemetery on West 21st Street, one of the oldest in the city, in the coming weeks.

A Place To Mourn

06/16/2006
Staff Writer
My greatest lesson about graves came in an unlikely place: an airplane terminal. In 1981 I traveled to Israel to cover, among many assignments, the World Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors, a once-in-a-lifetime conference/reunion/symposium based at Jerusalem's International Convention Center.

Aid Camp For Falash Mura Resumes Operations

05/25/2006
Staff Writer
A Falash Mura social welfare compound in northern Ethiopia that closed last week, following threats against its local leadership, was reopened on Sunday, after its director was released from jail, according to Ethiopian Jewry activists. The facility in Gondar, which provides food and education for some 10,000 members of the Falash Mura community, "functions as before, without any change," said Avraham Neguise, general manager of the Jerusalem-based South Wing to Zion advocacy group.

Polish Jewish Museum A Tough Sell Here

05/19/2006
Staff Writer
Victor Markowicz, a Siberian-born philanthropist who grew up in Poland and later moved to the United States, spends much of his time these days asking fellow Jewish philanthropists in the U.S. to contribute to a Jewish museum to be built in Warsaw in the next few years. Markowicz's friends, in turn, ask him something: "Why in Warsaw? Why in Poland?" Many American Jews (born here or in the Old Country) support the idea of a museum devoted to Jews from Poland, to which a majority of American Jewry can trace their roots.

New Life For Ancient Pilgrimage

05/19/2006
Staff Writer
In Arabic, the name al ghriba means the strange one or the marvelous one, but the Al Ghriba Synagogue meant death for 21 people four years ago. The synagogue on Djerba, a southern Tunisian island, was the site of an al Qaeda terrorist attack in April 2002, and Jewish pilgrims who had come for centuries for a two-day Lag B'Omer celebration stopped coming. Tuesday was Lag B'Omer, and the pilgrims came back.

An Attorney Who Never Says Nyet

05/12/2006
Staff Writer
An "accident" of fate recently brought a young Jewish girl from an orphanage in Ukraine to a new life with relatives in Brooklyn.
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