News

Across The Great Divide

03/23/2007
Staff Writer
In a synagogue library in northern Westchester, a dozen senior citizens sit around a long table discussing current events. In a temple conference room on the Upper West Side, a young family talks about the tensions raised by a child’s serious illness. In the meeting room of a Long Island JCC, a group of recent widows share photographs and memories of their late husbands.

RIETS’ Rabbi Elimelech Schachter, 93

03/09/2007
Staff Writer
Rabbi Elimelech Schachter, a faculty member at the Yeshiva University rabbinical school for nearly 50 years, died Feb. 26 in Borough Park. He was 93. Rabbi Schachter served as professor of rabbinics at the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary and taught at many divisions of YU, mentoring generations of rabbinical students. He was the author of “The Babylonian and Jerusalem Mishnah and wrote several rabbinic opinions and scholarly articles.

After 500 Years, A Return To Judaism

Miquel Seguara, a ‘Chueta’ descendant of Mallorcan Jews forced to convert, reclaims his heritage.
12/24/2009
Special To The Jewish Week

More than five centuries after his ancestors were forced to convert to Catholicism, and more than 300 years after a relative was burned at the stake for secretly practicing Judaism, Miquel Segura of Mallorca, Spain, returned to the Jewish people.

Mezuzah Standoff In Ft. Lauderdale

02/23/2007
Staff Writer
A mezuzah placed on the door of a condo in South Florida, of all places, is stirring a controversy. Laurie Richter, a recent law school graduate, attached the mezuzah to the doorpost of her condo apartment in Fort Lauderdale when she moved in on Dec. 1, and the condo board told her recently to take it down. The Port condominium told Richter that the mezuzah violates bylaws that prohibit owners and occupants from attaching, hanging, affixing or displaying anything on the building’s walls, doors, balconies, railings and windows.

The Torah In The Window

01/19/2007
Staff Writer
Each year the 12th-grade students of the Solomon Schechter School of Westchester spend a week in Poland, on the way to Israel, learning about Jewish history at the site of death camps, synagogues and forests. This year their most poignant lesson came at an antiques shop on a Warsaw side street. They discovered a Torah scroll there.

For Jewish Politics, A Decade Of Declines

Civil liberties, Jewish power, unity on Israel, confidence in elected officials all took hits in a period scarred by 9/11.
12/24/2009
Assistant Managing Editor

At the end of the 1990s, the nation seemed to want nothing more than a scandal-free White House and reassurance that computers wouldn’t go haywire when the clock struck midnight on New Year’s Eve.

But a decade later, the political landscape has been radically transformed, and several important narratives have unfolded that will change Jewish life in America forever.

Grave Memories

12/22/2006
Staff Writer
It began with a visit to a single grave. About a decade ago, Rabbi Manfred Gans, spiritual leader of Congregation Machane Chodosh in Forest Hills, accompanied a congregant, a recent widower, to the man’s late wife’s grave in Beth David Cemetery in Elmont, L.I. The congregant, Jack Kremski, and his wife, Anna, were Holocaust survivors, natives of Czestachowa, in Poland.

Remembering Galveston’s Forgotten Emigres

12/24/2009
Staff Writer

A hundred years and a few miles from an often-overlooked point in American Jewish history, some visitors from Houston stood in front of a Hebrew-language eye chart in Galveston, Texas earlier this month.
The chart, a facsimile of one that tested the reading abilities of Jewish immigrants in the early 20th century, is among hundreds of artifacts in “Forgotten Gateway: Coming to America through Galveston Island,” an exhibition that opened last month at Moody Gardens, a tourist park on Offatts Bayou.

The Battle Of The Generations

12/24/2009
Staff Writer

It was billed as a dialogue between a young, anti-establishment figure, turned off by many of the Jewish community’s most venerable institutions, and the top executive of what’s arguably the community’s most established organization, UJA-Federation of New York.

But, at some points during the evening, it seemed as if their roles were reversed, with the young rebel coming across as the rugged individualist, resistant to any compromise, and the older speaker more of a collectivist, concerned about the common good.

The Battle of the Generations

Forum pits young, anti-establishment figure against top UJA-Federation of New York exec
12/23/2009
Special to the Jewish Week

It was billed as a dialogue between a young, anti-establishment figure, turned off by many of the Jewish community’s most venerable institutions, and the top executive of what’s arguably the community’s most established organization, UJA-Federation of New York.

Daniel Sieradski, left, and John Ruskay: Who’s counter-cultural now?
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