News

The War, At Makor

08/11/2006
Staff Writer
A green hatchet, some red Cedars of Lebanon, some poetry, some cartoons, some photographs, some blog journals printed out on pink sheets of paper. In the weeks since the war in Lebanon began, a wide variety of artistic and non-artistic types have expressed their feelings about the fighting — and the 92nd Street Y’s Makor Gallery on the Upper West Side has put many of their expressions in 8-by-10-inch wooden frames and hung them in a public display.

Katyushas: Going Once, Going Twice

08/11/2006
Staff Writer
How much would you pay for a few shards of twisted steel or some quarter-inch-diameter steel balls? If the metal items are the remnants of Katyusha rockets fired at Israel in recent weeks, the going rate is at least $52 and $24.99, respectively. Those were the high bids offered, as of early this week, by potential customers on the Internet eBay.com auction site.

Schumer Urges Repairs To Jewish Cemeteries

08/04/2006
Staff Writer
Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) in a letter sent last week to Romanian President Traian Basescu urged Romania to restore and protect the country’s Jewish cemeteries, which fell into disrepair during the communist era. “Cemeteries are an important issue to worldwide Jewry, and Jewish cemeteries are no exception,” Schumer wrote. “For many Jews in the United States these cemeteries are the last link to their ancestry.”

A Banner Day At City Hall

08/04/2006
Staff Writer
The flag in the background with the sky-blue stripes and Magen David, now torn and battered and stained, once flew in Lower Manhattan. The Israeli flag was among the banners of several nations that hung in the entrance of one of the World Trade Center buildings, representing countries that had commercial interests in the landmark skyscrapers.

The Stubble Of Remembrance

08/04/2006
Staff Writer
I hadn’t seen Nissim, owner of my favorite kosher restaurant in my Queens neighborhood, for a while, but he saw something new on me right away. “That’s one of those Three Weeks things, right?” he said, pointing to my face with a note of concern. It had sprouted a growth of unkempt, untrimmed beard since I last had sampled his steamed dumplings and egg roll.

A Realtor To The Rescue

07/28/2006
Staff Writer
The Kaminer family of Kiryat Bialik, a Haifa suburb, needed a new place to live, temporarily, on short notice. A Katyusha missile fired by Hezbollah terrorists in Lebanon exploded near their apartment two weeks ago. It was 20 yards away. “It was a miracle no one was injured,” says Chaim Kaminer, a 59-year-old businessman. His home wasn’t damaged, “thanks God,” but his family’s psyche was. “It’s driving you crazy to stay all day in the shelter.”

The War, Personalized

07/28/2006
Staff Writer
Full-scale wars, which Israel has fought many times in the past, and major army operations, which Israel has found itself in during recent weeks in Gaza and Lebanon, usually bring stories of troop maneuvers and military analysis, call-ups of the reserves, and civilian sacrifices. The human side of war is often hard to picture from a distance, particularly when the fighting involves Israel, a country that few Americans, even American Jews, have visited.

Rabbi Seymour Fox, Conservative Educator, 77

07/21/2006
Staff Writer
Rabbi Seymour Fox, a prominent Jewish educator in the United States and Israel for a half-century, died of heart failure July 10 in his Jerusalem home, two weeks after announcing his plans to retire from administration and return to teaching. He was 77. Known in Israel by his Hebrew name, Shlomo, he had served with the educational Mandel Foundation at the time of his death. A prolific author, he was known as an inspirational teacher and manager.
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