Supreme Court

High Court Prayer Ruling ‘Could Have Been Far Worse,’ AJC Expert Says

05/05/2014
Staff Writer

Updated at 2:50 p.m. to include a statement from the Religious Action Center in paragraph seven, and from the Orthodox Union in paragraph 11.

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling on Monday that upholds the right of a town in Western New York to begin its public meetings with prayers that are usually Christian is a blow to Jewish or other non-Christian interests, but “could have been far worse,” said a legal expert who works for the American Jewish Committee.

ADL And Other Jewish Groups Hail Ruling Against DOMA

06/26/2013

The Anti-Defamation League on Wednesday hailed the decision by the Supreme Court to uphold the federal rights of same sex couples in states that allow same sex marriages.

The DOMA lawsuit had been brought by a Jewish woman, Edith Windsor, who was forced to pay federal taxes on the estate of her late wife, Thea Spyer, who was also Jewish, despite the fact that their Canadian marriage was recognized as legal by the state of New York, where they resided.

SCOTUS Rulings: A Roller Coaster Ride For Liberal Jewish Groups

06/26/2013
JTA

A slight bump up on affirmative action, a plunge on voting rights, and on gay marriage, the mountaintop: federal legitimacy.

Jewish Groups Pan Voting Rights Ruling

06/25/2013
Staff Writer

Several Jewish organizations this week condemned a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that in effect strikes down a provision in the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that has served as protection for otherwise disenfranchised voters for nearly a half-century.

Appeals Court To Reconsider Jerusalem Passport Case

03/11/2013

A U.S. appeals court will hear arguments again on whether Americans born in Jerusalem can have "Israel" listed as their birthplace in their passports.

The U.S. Supreme Court ordered a lower court to decide whether passports issued in Jerusalem should say Israel.

Supreme Court Rejects Rubashkin Appeal

10/03/2012

The U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal of former Agriprocessors executive Sholom Rubashkin’s conviction and sentence for bank fraud.

The court on Oct. 1 rejected the appeal, which asked the Supreme Court for a new trial, and to shorten his 27-year sentence, which the appeals court upheld as “reasonable.” Rubashkin’s request said it violates federal sentencing laws for a first-time, nonviolent offender.

The court offered no comment alongside its rejection.

Rabbinical Students No Longer TAP-ped Out

State to grant $18 million in tuition aid in tough fiscal year; report alleges political deal.

04/05/2011
Assistant Managing Editor

Years of lobbying by Agudath Israel of America appear to have borne fruit now that the state budget includes allocations to help struggling undergraduate rabbinical students pay tuition.

Agudath Israel says Dean Skelos, who controls the state Senate with a slim Republican majority, was an “avid champion” of funds

Jewish groups (predictably) divided on Supreme Court religious school funding decision

The ADL is criticizing and the Orthodox Union is praising today's Supreme Court decision in a key church-state case, Arizona Christian Tuition Organization v. Winn. That decision, analysts say, could make it harder for taxpayers to oppose public funding for parochial schools on church-state grounds.

The case involved an Arizona law that allows taxpayers to take 100 percent tax credits for donations to “school tuition organizations” - groups that provide funding to religious and other private schools.

Bus Gender Segregation Can Continue, With Caveats, Supreme Court Rules

01/06/2011

JERUSALEM (JTA) -- Gender segregation on public buses can continue as long as passengers agree, Israel's Supreme Court ruled.

The practice may continue on dozens of bus lines serving the haredi Orthodox community, known as "Mehadrin" lines, as long as passengers are not coerced and no violence erupts, the ruling, issued Thursday, said.

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