Rebecca Yoshor, 20
Wednesday, June 5, 2013
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All-American hoopster.

When she was in elementary school, she used to stand a head taller than all the boys. Now, at 6 feet tall, Rebecca Yoshor stands out on the basketball court.

A Houston native, Yoshor was named a Capital One NCAA Division III Academic All-America in February. Playing forward on Stern College’s team, the Lady Maccabees (fondly known as the Lady Macs), she was picked as a second-team All-America. She is the first Stern student-athlete in Yeshiva University history to receive the honor. It goes to students with an outstanding combination of scholastic and athletic achievements. Yoshor totes a 3.97 grade point average (4.0 scale) and averages 16.6 points and 14.8 rebounds per game on the court.

“I’m proud to be a Jew on the court,” she said. “Playing sports on a high level is not so common in our communities. I hope receiving this honor shows other Jewish women that you can pursue your talents and passions without ever having to compromise your tradition.”

With school and hours on the court, how does she balance it all? “I prioritize. And really, it’s just making time for the things you care about. Basketball is not just another to-do on my list — it’s what I love.”

Yoshor’s been on the court since she was a little girl. Her whole family is “kind of obsessed with the game. My dad used to come home from work and say, ‘C’mon, kids, who’s up for a two-on-two!’” she recalled, laughing.

Yoshor hopes to pursue a career in public relations. Her future on the court? “I will always play for fun, probably at an urban league level.” Plans to join the WNBA? Laughing, Yoshor finished, “Let’s take this one shot at a time.”

Social justice activist: Rebecca is a board member of the Social Justice Society (SJS) at Stern. She was inspired to join SJS because of the obligation she feels as a Jew, woman and proud American citizen. Her role model when it comes to activism: Golda Meir. “Meeting her would probably toughen me up a bit,” she said.

 

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