South Florida

As Jewish Boomers Retire, Is South Florida Losing Its Appeal?

Small but significant drop-off seen as retirees look elsewhere. Arkansas, anyone?

JNS
07/16/2014

Is the long-standing trend of Jews retiring to South Florida on the decline? It depends how you look at the numbers, according to demographer Dr. Ira Sheskin.

A view of Washington Avenue and 15th Street in South Beach, Miami, once a prime spot for Jewish seniors. Wikimedia Commons

Miami Beach: Return Engagement

After an absence of more than 30 years, a traveler confronts a changed, but still very Jewish, city.

12/24/2013
JTA
Story Includes Video: 
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Miami Beach, Fla. — Everyone knows that Jews and Miami Beach go together like horseradish and gefilte fish. Matzah balls and chicken soup. Corned beef and rye. Chopped liver and … you get the picture.

An aerial view of the iconic Fountainebleau Hotel, designed by Morris Lapidus. Photo courtesy JTA

Breaking News! Ex-NBA Star To Coach Jewish High School in South Florida

The traditional dynamic of black-Jewish relations in sports and entertainment is pretty straight-forward, and nothing to brag about: African Americans make the product, Jews sell it. You don't need to dig too deep into history to find relevant examples: Lyor Cohen and Rick Rubin ran the show at Def Jam, the hip-hop label juggernaut, until only recently. And David Stern still happily resides over the NBA.

Fla. Survivors Caught In Cruel Funding Irony

Despite doubling of home care money from Germany, needs going unmet in Broward, other counties.

01/04/2011
Staff Writer

Margate, Fla. — At the age of 87, Molly Gruda spends much of her day sitting in a reclining chair in her den and using a wheelchair to get around. Her primary caregiver is her husband, Sam. He’s 96.

Because she is a Holocaust survivor, Gruda is eligible for German government money, administered through the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, to provide her with a home attendant during the day for 25 hours each week. Her husband is not a survivor and thus not entitled to such help.

Sam Gruda, 96, is the primary caregiver for his Auschwitz survivor wife Molly, who is 87 and ailing. stewart ain
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