Shoah

The Digital Shtetl

If the creative team of Rocket Chair Media is any indication, the Millennial Generation's approach to the Shoah will be something quite different from what’s come before. The prologue to their new digital epic fantasy “Radzyn” now begins online, with daily installations this week and monthly thereafter.

From “Radzyn.” Courtesy Rocket Chair Media

Yizkor For The Hungarian Shoah

This is the 70th anniversary of the Holocaust coming to Hungary.

03/12/2014
Associate Editor

Editor's Note: Click here for a news update on the 70th anniversary of the Hungarian Shoah.

In the Hungarian village of Csenger, by the banks of the river Smoosh, in the pages in a yizkor book, a dead man tells a tale. It is 1938. “Nine o’clock one Shabbos morning, people could be seen gathering together near the big market place,” looking up at the sky. “I was also standing there,” says the witness, “and in the middle of the crowd was a man with black glasses (probably binoculars) who kept passing them around in the crowd, and people kept looking upward … they saw two suns, one near the next.” Some say “the world is coming to an end.” The elders remember this omen in 1914, before the terrible war.

Hungarian Jews rounded up in Budapest in 1944. Wikimedia Commons

Frieda Hikind, Auschwitz Survivor And Assemblyman's Mother, Dies At 95

06/24/2013
Assistant Managing Editor
Story Includes Video: 
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Shiva was completed Monday morning for Frieda Hikind, 95, a Holocaust survivor and mother of Assemblyman Dov Hikind of Brooklyn.

Temple Emanu-el Kids' Program Highlights Childhood Shoah Stories

04/17/2013
Staff Writer

Some religious school students at Temple Emanu-El heard a firsthand account of the Holocaust recently. And they saw the New York premiere of a German-made Holocaust documentary.

During two Yom HaShoah speeches at the Upper East Side Reform synagogue, Holocaust survivor Leslie Schwartz talked about his wartime experiences (the rest of his family died in Auschwitz) and showed a documentary about his life produced by a Bavarian  television channel (an English-language version was recently released at his request).

The Shoah And The Unfathomable

06/26/2012
Special To The Jewish Week
Candlelighting, Readings: Shabbat candles: 8:13 p.m. Torah: Numbers 19:1-22:1 Haftarah: Judges 11:1-33 Havdalah: 9:21 p.m.              
Shlomo Riskin

Marking Yom HaShoah: Calendars And Memory, God And History

04/27/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

The Orthodox Chief Rabbinate decided in 1949 that the Shoah (the Hebrew, literally meaning "catastrophe," that is now used for the Holocaust) should be commemorated on the 10th of Tevet, a minor fast day already established in the Jewish calendar.

Claude Lanzmann, Briefly

Rare screening of three of the ‘Shoah’ director’s more recent short films at Film Comment Select series.

02/22/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

In the death camp at Treblinka there was a fake railroad station that included a clock on which the painted hands always read 6 o’clock. The entire construction was a grotesque joke perpetrated by the camp’s commandant Fritz Stangl; in Treblinka, time stood still because all those brought there were dead from the moment they entered.

A scene from Lanzmann's "Sobibor."

"Shoah" and The New Yorker's Mea Culpa

When Claude Lanzmann's nine-and-a-half hour epic "Shoah" debuted in 1985, much of Europe was aghast, infuriated, ashamed -- and profoundly moved. No film to date had captured the devolution of humanity that the Holocaust required -- and, years later, the sublimated memory and even outright denial that bystanders, Nazis and even victims still maintained.  

Timothy Snyder on "Shoah": Lanzmann's Triumph, and Tragedy

Last summer the Yale historian Timothy Snyder drew much attention with his provocative essay detailing the ways Auschwitz is a poor symbol of the Holocaust: Jews died mainly by bullets, not by the gas chambers typified in Auschwitz. And while most Jews sent to Auschwitz were from Western Europe, the majority of those murdered came from the East.

Timothy Snyder on "Shoah": Lanzmann's Triumph, and Tragedy

Last summer the Yale historian Timothy Snyder drew much attention with his provocative essay detailing the ways Auschwitz is a poor symbol of the Holocaust: Jews died mainly by bullets, not by the gas chambers typified in Auschwtiz. And most Jews sent to Auschwitz were from Western Europe, yet most those murdered came from the East.

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