Shabbat dinner

The Kitchen's Rabbi Noa Kushner

Founding rabbi of SF's The Kitchen, celebrating its 2nd birthday this month.

06/03/2013
Food & Wine Editor
Story Includes Video: 
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San Francisco’s indie Jewish community, The Kitchen, celebrates its second birthday this month. The Kitchen supports weekly DIY Shabbat dinners and other holiday food gatherings including a Purim party and a 100-person Sukkot feast. The Kitchen recently reserved a 500-person space to hold High Holy Day services. Additionally, The Kitchen hosts events for young singles called Kitchen 24/7, and has a Kitchen Mama’s program, bringing together 60 parents with young children for an earlier Shabbat services and dinner gathering. The organization places a high priority on food because “we recognize that so much of religious life is social and happens around the table. Food is this local currency and language in San Francisco, and we see it as a very important part of what we’re doing,” The Kitchen’s founding rabbi, Noa Kushner, said. In my Q&A with Kushner, she shares her dining do’s and don’ts when it comes to her kitchen table. 

Rabbi Noa Kushner. Photo courtesy Noa Kushner

Let's Start With Dessert

When dessert means dairy, Shabbat dinner gets shaken up.

04/17/2013
Staff Writer

For a pro-substitute counterpoint to this post, read Food & Wine Editor Emma Goss' take on almond milk.

I keep a kosher home and in general, I enjoy it. My husband, male that he is, tries to rationalize kashrut whenever it comes up in conversation by talking about Trichinosis in Ancient Times and all that jazz, but I don't feel the need.

Shabbat candles are law. Chicken is custom! Fotolia

H.A.L.T. Before You Pass Go

05/10/2012
Jewish Week Online Columnist

A month after we met, my future husband Michael and I took our first camping vacation near New Hope, PA. The flower, the trees and yes, the romance, were all in full bloom. We walked the quaint town's shop-lined streets, hiked some local mountains (fine, hills) and told one another our dreams for the future.

That is, until suddenly and without warning, I became utterly uncommunicative.

Deborah Grayson Riegel
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