senior citizens

Jewish Seniors Helped; Youth With Disabilities Get Jobs

Haley McCormick-Thompson, a young adult with a developmental disability, spends part of her day transporting senior residents of United Hebrew from their rooms to their various activities throughout the day. One of the more lighthearted activities is the sing-along, where she stands at the front of a crowded room leading a group of senior residents, helping them follow along with song sheets.

“I really care about the residents,” Haley said. “I like helping them if they’re sad and I like staying late and helping. I am always willing to do extra.”

Haley is modest. Staff say she is a rock star with the residents.

Haley McCormick-Thompson helps a resident. Courtesy of Rick Guidotti

Brooklyn Seniors To Keep Kosher Lunch Program; West Side Center Still Fighting

Coney Island, West Side centers serving elderly to shut down for non-budgetary reasons.

04/05/2013
Assistant Managing Editor

One of two kosher lunch programs fighting to keep their doors open has won a reprieve, organizers and a city councilman told The Jewish Week Monday.

The city-funded Ocean Parkway Senior Center, which serves about 100 people, will share its current space with a new program for disabled seniors that will receive federal Medicaid dollars. Both will be housed at a building owned by Ahi Ezer Housing Development Fund Corp., a non-profit affiliated with a Sephardic congregation in Midwood.

Last month the organization served the senior center, run by the Jewish Commnity Council of Greater Coney Island with an eviction notice to make way for the new Social Adult Day Care program. But negotations between the two organizations and mediation by Coucilman Domenic Recchia Jr., resulted in a compromise.

“The Ocean Parkway Senior Center is a home away from home for many of Brooklyn’s seniors providing critical services and hundreds of meals on a daily basis to those who need it most," said Recchia, a Democrat who repesents parts of Coney Island and Brighton Beach, in a statement. "Its closure would have devastated our community and those whose lives it touches. That’s why this announcement is such an enormous relief and why it was so important that we fight to ensure that this center remain open to the community.” 

Still up in the air is the status of several dozen seniors who meet daily at Club 76 on the Upper West Side for a kosher lunch, companionship, help with services, and entertainment and exercise programs.

Among them is Ruth Shapiro, who moved to the Upper West Side 55 years ago, when her fmaily needed a bigger place than their Lower East Side apartment.

Today, she’s alone and about to turn 90.  

Kosher lunch program at West Side Institutional Synagogue feeds between 40 abd 75 seniors. Adam Dickter

Bubbie and Zaydie in the Social Media Cloud

When I first logged on to Facebook in 2004 none of my real life friends had accounts yet. At that stage in the social networking site's development, a Facebook account was only for university students (or at least anyone with a university email account). I was working at a campus Hillel and my .edu email address gave me access to Facebook so I could interface with the Jewish students on campus.

The fastest growth in social networkworking usage has come from Internet users 74 & older

Greenfield: Seniors Can’t Read New Ballots

11/02/2010
Assistant Managing Editor

Senior citizens are complaining that paper ballots designed by New York’s Board of Elections are too small to read, says City Councilman David Greenfield.

New York state switched this year from antiquated voting machines to ballots that are filled out and then scanned and recorded by computer.

Since candidates for local judgeships, Assembly and Senate, Congress and four statewide offices are included on one sheet, as well as a ballot proposal on term limits, the type may be too small for those who are visually impaired.

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