The Arts

Film Recalls Controversy Over U.S. Jews’ Inaction During WWII

12/09/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

Pierre Sauvage has focused as a filmmaker on Jewish subjects.  He owes his life to the good people of Le Chambon, France, who saved him as a child, along with many others, during the Holocaust.  His 1989 film, Weapons of the Spirit, documents their story. 

Woody’s ‘Honeymoon’ Home Run

Allen’s older man-younger woman (no?) romance caps off ‘Relatively Speaking’ series of one-acts.

10/23/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

He’s done it so many times, showing us a lecherous middle-aged man and a nubile young woman, decades his junior, and the love that blossoms between them. You would be forgiven for thinking that Woody Allen has already exploited this theme from every possible angle.

Ari Graynor and Steve Guttenberg in Woody Allen's "Honeymoon Motel." Joan Marcus

A Rabbi's Moral Choices

‘A Splintered Soul’ looks at the often-paradoxical nature of ethical decision-making.

10/19/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

Trauma leaves nothing whole. In Alan Lester Brooks’ new play, “A Splintered Soul,” a maverick rabbi in postwar San Francisco risks his life and career to resettle Jewish refugees from the Holocaust. Yet aiding others plunges the rabbi into a world of agonizing moral choices, in which things are not always what they seem.

Ella Dershowitz, the daughter of Harvard Law professor Alan Dershowitz, makes her N.Y. theatrical debut in Alan Lester Brooks

A Rabbi’s Moral Choices

‘A Splintered Soul’ looks at the often-paradoxical nature of ethical decision-making.

10/19/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

Trauma leaves nothing whole. In Alan Lester Brooks’ new play, “A Splintered Soul,” a maverick rabbi in postwar San Francisco risks his life and career to resettle Jewish refugees from the Holocaust. Yet aiding others plunges the rabbi into a world of agonizing moral choices, in which things are not always what they seem. “A Splintered Soul” opens Off Broadway Oct. 21 at Theater Three in Midtown with a cast that features Ella Dershowitz, daughter of celebrity lawyer Alan Dershowitz, in her New York theatrical debut.

Ella Dershowitz, daughter of Harvard professor Alan Dershowitz, makes her N.Y. debut in Alan Lester Brooks' "A Splintered Soul."

For Argentine Filmmaker, The Past Is Present

A look at the art and truth of the documentaries of Leandro Katz.

08/10/2011
Jewish Week Film Critic

For the artist, the history of the 20th century is a stinging nettle that must be grasped with care and the knowledge that pain will surely follow. For the Jewish artist and the Latin American artist, that certainty is magnified by experience. So how does a Latin American Jewish artist approach the subject of history?

Che Guevara in a scene from Leandro Katz’s “The Day You’ll Love Me.” (Freddy Alborta)

The Fringe Gets Religion

Two Jewish-themed works mine serious spiritual matters at iconoclastic theater festival.

08/10/2011
Special To The Jewish Week
Religion is not the first thing that one thinks of in connection with the Fringe Festival, the smorgasbord of zany, often ribald theatrical fare that springs up every August in New York. But this year’s Fringe includes two plays, both by Jewish playwrights, which take on serious religious themes — a retelling of  the Garden of Eden story and the feverish fictional monologue of a shamanistic rabbi.
The poet Alexander Nemser, whose one-man show is “Moshe Feldstein: Icon of Self-Realization.”

Taboo, But Educational

Jewish version of popular Hasbro game gets clues from Encyclopedia Judaica.

07/21/2011
Staff Writer

When Seth Burstein and Ian Framson started throwing clues at each other while playing the card game “Taboo,” they came up with more than just a way to kill an afternoon.

The two Jewish friends and serial entrepreneurs, amused by the game that requires teams to guess topics without the most obvious hints, began offering a mix of Hebrew and Yiddish phrases to help one another.

Board of Jewish Education: Seth Burstein with his Hebrew-word packed game.

Taboo, But Educational

Jewish version of popular board game gets clues from Encyclopedia Judaica.

07/21/2011
Staff Writer

When Seth Burstein and Ian Framson started throwing clues at each other while playing the board game “Taboo,” they came up with more than just a way to kill an afternoon.

The two Jewish friends and serial entrepreneurs, amused by the game that requires teams to guess topics without the most obvious hints, began offering a mix of Hebrew and Yiddish phrases to help one another.

Shoah Tale Loses Punch On Screen

Adapted from novel, ‘Sarah’s Key,’ with Kristen Scott Thomas, lacks dramatic jolt.

07/19/2011
Jewish Week Film Critic

“Sarah’s Key,” the new film by Gilles Paquet-Brenner, which opens on July 22, is a textbook case of the pitfalls of adapting a novel for the screen.

Kristin Scott Thomas is a journalist investigating a 1942 roundup of Jews by the Nazis in "Sarah's Key."

Yavneh, Pioneer Group On Campus, Recalled

07/11/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

Yavneh, a 1960s and `70s organization of Orthodox college students, is, in the words of “The Greening of American Orthodox Judaism: Yavneh in the 1960s” by Benny Kraut, “hardly remembered today, except perhaps by former members.”

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