Saul Bellow

Saul Bellow's Jewish Problem: The Lost (And Recently Found) Lecture

The New York Review of Books published the second and last installment of Saul Bellow's lectures on being a Jewish writer--and, boy, is it a complicated. At root, he's gives his take on what it means to be a secular Jew in the modern world, particularly if your Jewish identity is central to you.

Notes from the Grave: Saul Bellow's Unpublished Jewish Lecture

“Saul Bellow: Letters” had plenty of un-read Jewish material in it when it appeared last year. But apparently it didn’t have the astounding lecture “A Jewish Writer in America,” published for the first time in the New York Review of Books this week.

Hijacking the Holocaust: Or, Did Comcast Emotionally Blackmail Spielberg?

I'm sure Comcast's p.r. people did not mean this to happen: early this week, Comcast, the cable provider sent out a press release that it would give away on its website and to subscribers 10 Holocaust documentaries, free of charge, and selected by Steven Spielberg's USC Shoah Foundation Institute. The press release said the altruistic gesture was meant to commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Day, which falls on May 1.  See, corporations aren't so bad, right?

From Glenn Beck to Broadway, to Saul Bellow and Back

First, if you didn't get a chance to read my blog post from yesterday on the uncomfortable topic of Jews and money, read it here.  The feedback has been strong, so read the full thing, but here's what it's about: I give a brief summary of historian Jerry Muller's important book "Capitalism and the Jews," and Abraham Foxman's less successful attempt, "Jews and Money: The Story of A Stereotype."  And with Glenn Beck duking it out with George Soros, not to mention A

Mr. Bellow’s Planet

11/16/2010
Staff Writer

Fittingly, the story of how novelist Benjamin Taylor became the editor of the newly published collection of Saul Bellow’s letters begins with a letter. Not a letter between Bellow and Taylor, to be sure — they never knew each other, in fact — but a letter between Taylor and Philip Roth.

The novelist’s letters — 708 of them — reveal his complicated relationship with Jewish life.
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