Sandy Koufax

Let’s Do It For Sandy!


No one remembers the baseball games that Sandy Koufax played.

Sandy Koufax. By publicity still (N.Y. Public Library Picture Collection) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

Pews Or Bleachers? A Yom Kippur Dilemma

With the Washington Nationals scheduled for the holiest day of the Jewish calendar, baseball fans are in a fix.

Editorial Intern

The Lerner family, owners of the National League’s Washington Nationals baseball team, have spoken: they won’t be attending any playoff games that take place on Yom Kippur, they told the press last week. Taking after famed Jewish baseball player Sandy Koufax, they’ve decided the High Holiday is no time for games.

Sandy Koufax, famed Jewish baseball player, did not play in the 1965 World Series because it fell on Yom Kippur. AP

Sandy Koufax, Redux: Nats Owners Swear Off Yom Kippur Playoffs

Staff Writer

It’s a Sandy Koufax moment, at the ownership level.

Where Have You Gone, Sandy Koufax?

Catching up with the baseball legend, as the 50th anniversary of his iconic Yom Kippur day off approaches. An exclusive Jewish Week interview.

Staff Writer

“I can’t picture people talking about me 50 years from now.”

— Sandy Koufax in a 1965 Sports Illustrated interview.

The most famous Jewish left hand in sports history pitches. Courtesy of Los Angeles Dodgers

New Painting Signed By 26 Jewish Baseball Players


( -- In the midst of the Major League Baseball playoffs, an artist came out with a new lithograph painting that depicts 27 Jewish baseball players and contains the signatures of 26 of them — all except the late Hall of Famer Hank Greenberg.

Closer To Home: Of Baseball, Faith And Family

Editor And Publisher

When I was growing up, baseball was all about fathers and sons.

I am grateful that my Dad transmitted his love of the game to my older brother and me, and am reminded of it each spring, when the promise of a new season still fills me with childlike excitement.

Gary Rosenblatt

MVP Ryan Braun Denies Report Of Performance Drug Use


Ryan Braun, the first Jewish player in more than five decades to win one of baseball's Most Valuable Player awards, has reportedly tested positive for a performance-enhancing drug.

The Associated Press cited an unnamed source who said that the case was under appeal to an arbitrator under Major League Baseball’s drug program.

The Milwaukee Berwers left-fielder, 28, is disputing the results. According to USA Today, he dismissed the reports as "B.S."

Sandy Koufax headlines White House "Jewish Heritage Month" event

Sandy Koufax at the White House? Talk about Jewish royalty.

The Obama White House is holding the first – ever reception honoring Jewish Heritage Month tonight, and the unreleased guest list suggests something new in presidential Jewish outreach. There's an interesting cross section of Jewish athletes, columnists, writers, scholars and social innovators – but a noticeable lack of big-name Jewish organization pooh-bahs.

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