The List: Biggest Inclusion Plays And Players Of 2013

As we start the New Year, it’s important to look back on what was accomplished for inclusion of Jews with disabilities this past year. We planted the seeds for future progress. Most of the work focused on “setting the table” for inclusion: raising awareness, creating critical policies and standards, and developing and conducting training for professionals. Hopefully, 2014 will be the year of implementation. Meanwhile, here are the top plays and players of 2013.

Inclusion leaders, from left: Shelley Cohen, Donn Weinberg and Jennifer Lazlo Mizrahi. Photo courtesy Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi

Both Pioneers: Early Zionists, And Today's Inclusion Advocates

Last week I observed a first-of-its kind gathering – a five-day intensive professional training for American Jewish leaders on inclusion of people with disabilities. The forum took place in a kosher retreat center outside of Baltimore, and people had came from many cities to learn a special curriculum that was designed by inclusion experts Shelly Christensen and Prof. Steve Eidelman.

Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi

A New Survey Reveals 'A Distance Between Words And Deeds'

Almost 100 percent of the 2,607 relatively engaged Jews polled by RespectAbilityUSA and Jerusalem U agree that “Jewish events and organizations should be as welcoming and inclusive of people with disabilities as everyone else,” with 89 percent of the sample agreeing strongly.

Donn Weinberg and Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi, founders of RespectAbilityUSA. Photo courtesy RespectAbilityUSA
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