Repentance

Brokenness Is A Part Of Life

09/13/2013
Jewish Week Online Columnist

On the High Holy Days, we are encouraged to look back. We ponder the year that has passed, what has transpired, and how we might change it in the future. But what if we are stuck? What if we can’t get past a specific event? How many of us have experienced a terrible ordeal?

Rabbi Marci Bellows

The Errors Of Ours Ways

The text of my reading material last week on the eve of Rosh HaShanah was about people making errors. The subtext: some errors are never forgotten, never wiped clean, stain a person’s reputation forever.

I wasn’t reading Days of Repentance theology. I was reading The New York Times sports pages.

Bill Buckner

Repentance, Atonement And Independence

09/11/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Candlelighting, Readings:
Shabbat candles: 6:48 p.m.
Torah: Deut. 29:9-30:20
Haftarah: Isaiah 61:10-63:9
Havdalah: 7:45 p.m.

Rabbi David Kalb

Yom Kippur Reflections

10/06/2011
Jewish Week Online Columnist

As the Yom Kippur approaches, rather than present a specific ethical quandary I present some reflections and tips on what this holy day can mean for us as we perform the sacred act of engaging with other human beings and with God:

Rabbi Joshua Hammerman

Lurching Toward Elul: Tracking The Jewish Psyche

08/19/2011
Jewish Week Online Columnist

In the jargon of mental health professionals, when you say that someone’s “affect is labile,” it means that he/she tends to flip back and forth between different moods. It’s another way of saying that a person is behaving unpredictably, alternating between happy and sad, hope and despair, in ways that are hard to predict and liable to change at any moment.

 

Rabbi Gerald Skolnik

When Technology Needs a Day of Atonement Too

I've been following the Offlining campaign pretty closely. It's the brainchild of Eric Yaverbaum and Mark DiMassimo. They partnered to launch Offlining, an initiative to promote unplugging that was introduced on Father's Day, to ask people to make a pledge to have 10 device-free dinners between then and Thanksgiving. To date, more than 10,500 have signed on to this pledge.

Will you go offline on Yom Kippur?
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