Preschool

Orthodox Groups Divided On New Pre-K Rules

Option to hold class six days a week called a good first step by some, unreasonable by others.

02/24/2015
Staff Writer

The de Blasio administration announced rule changes aimed at making it easier for Jewish schools to participate in its signature free universal preschool program. But Jewish organizations are divided on just how helpful these changes will be.

The city’s new rules will allow preschools to operate six days a week. But how many will want to?  Michael Datikash/JW

Pre-K On Sunday? Orthodox Groups Divided On New UPK Options

Changes like allowing schools to open six days a week called a good first step by some, unreasonable by others.

02/19/2015
Staff Writer

The de Blasio administration announced rule changes aimed at making it easier for Jewish schools to participate in its signature free universal preschool program. But Jewish organizations are divided on just how helpful these changes will be.

While Agudath Israel of America, an umbrella organization for chasidic and black-hat Orthodox groups, said the new rules represent “meaningful changes,” the Orthodox Union called the changes “cosmetic.” 

The city's new rules will allow preschools to operate six days a week. But would they want to? Michael Datikash/JW

When Universal Pre-K Is Not Universal

02/12/2015
Special To The Jewish Week

“We will offer every child, from every borough of this city, truly universal, full-day Pre-K.”

That was Mayor Bill de Blasio’s promise to the children of New York City one year ago in his inaugural State of the City address. The Mayor's pledge of a free pre-K program available to every four-year-old in New York City — regardless of background, religion, or socio-economic status — signaled an exciting and visionary approach to early childhood education for all New York preschoolers.

Jewish Winners, Losers In New Pre-K

DOE rules favor schools on far left and far right.

09/09/2014
Staff Writer

More than 50,000 4-year-olds headed off to the city’s expanded free preschool program last week. But for Jewish preschools, the new program has only benefitted those at the ends of the religious spectrum, leaving schools in the middle shut out.

Mazel Day School in Brighton Beach, above, is not participating in New York City's pre-K program. Amy Sara Clark/JW

Alef Bet Learning for Kids on iPad

At a recent Family Camp experience with twenty other young Jewish families, I noticed something that had changed from the previous year's gathering. iPads. This year, they were everywhere. You might think that it was the adults using Apple's slick tablets to read books, check email, or play Angry Birds. But it was actually the youngest of participants who were using the iPad, which could be the most expensive toy for the under 5 demographic.

Jewish children will use Mom & Dad's iPad to learn the Hebrew alphabet
Syndicate content