Pope Benedict XVI

Why I Love Ash Wednesday

I live in Hoboken, a town of churches (and 1 synagogue – hi, Rabbi Scheinberg!) This small city’s Catholic character is obvious to any casual visitor, and certainly struck us strongly when we were scouting the place out and toured many apartments for sale above whose pristine beds, plumped up attractively for prospective buyers, sat crucifixes large and small. In fact, one of my neighbors has in her living room two huge portraits: one of Frank Sinatra, and one of the Pope.

A Catholic woman prays with an ash cross on her forehead in Washington, D.C. in 2012. Getty Images

Who Will Follow The Pope's Lead?

 

“Pope Gives God Two Weeks’ Notice.”

Leave it to the New York tabloids, in this case the New York Post, to sum up the stunning news from the Vatican in a few words.

While the Catholic Church scrambles to elect a new pontiff by Easter, some aging leaders of the Jewish community might consider the precedent set by Benedict XVI in stepping down at the age of 85, citing deteriorating health.

Pope Benedict Is Principled, Frustrating

02/12/2013
Special To The Jewish Week

Pope Benedict XVI shocked the world by announcing his resignation, effective the end of February, and there are many ways to think about the significance of the event, including both the challenges and the opportunities in Catholic-Jewish relations that may come in the wake of his resignation.

Pope Calls For Peace Efforts, End To Persecution Of Christians In Middle East

11/27/2012

 At a gathering in Rome with Lebanon’s new cardinal, Pope Benedict XVI launched a new appeal for peace in Syria and the Middle East, the Associated Press reported.

“The church encourages all efforts for peace in the world and in the Middle East, a peace that will only be effective if it is based on authentic respect for other people,” Benedict told the gathering, which included several Lebanese pilgrims.

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