Photoshop

Honoring Tel Aviv: Editing Photos in the Name of Art

Yesterday's news was focused on photo editing. A national conversation on the ethics of doctoring photos was kicked off when a Brooklyn-based Hasidic Yiddish language newspaper used Photoshop to airbrush out two prominent women -- Hillary Clinton and Audrey Tomason -- from an iconic photo released by the White House. More than a rant on the extremes to which the ultra-Orthodox will go to keep photos of women from the pages of their newspapers, what I find most interesting is the question of when it is appropriate to alter a photograph.

Ron Shoshani's photo art captures Israel in a beautiful light

More on the Case of the Missing Hillary

Reading the comments and emails on Rabbi Jason Miller's Jewish Week  blog about the Yiddish-language newspaper that Photoshopped out Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and White House terrorism official Audrey Tomason from an official photo, I've been struck with how many readers, choking on outrage, seemed to blame the Jewish Week.

How could we do it, many fumed?  We should be ashamed.

Fauxtographing the News: From Herzl to the Flotilla

Cross-posted at Blog.RabbiJason.com

Photoshop might not have been around a century ago, but the altering of images to change history has been around for a very long time.

This is a doctored photo of Theodor Herzl from 1898
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