Philadelphia inquirer

Maurice Sendak’s Papers: Thoughts On An Artist’s Legacy

Maurice Sendak, the beloved and celebrated maker of children’s books, was much more than "Where the Wild Things Are." At his death in 2012, more than 10, 200 pieces of his work –  drawings, watercolors, manuscripts, proof copies and more – resided at the Rosenbach Museum in Philadelphia. The museum had hoped that this situation, which let them stage no fewer than 72 Sendak exhibitions since 1970, would continue. However, Peter Dobrin of the Philadelphia Inquirer recently broke the news that not only did Sendak leave the materials to the Maurice Sendak Foundation, but the foundation’s trustees have asked for their return to Sendak’s Ridgefield, Connecticut home, set to become a museum of sorts itself.

"Maurice Sendak's "Where The Wild Things Are"

Remembering A Journalistic Giant

I have a standard regimen every time I prepare to travel to Israel, about every year and a half. Buy some shekels. Arrange my interviews. Make sure my passport hasn’t expired.

And one non-standard step: I pull out a three-decades-old, tearing-at-the-edges, 20-page reprint of a series of stories written for the Philadelphia Inquirer in the wake of the start of the Camp David Middle East peace process.

Richard Ben Cramer: Rochester native wrote on world stage
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