Vayikra: Parenting And 'Perfection'

After Moses anoints the Tent of Appointed Meeting and the Priests who will officiate there, God speaks to him:

Explain to the sons of Israel the ways of bringing offerings to God. There will be offerings of animals and grains and fruit. Animals for sacrifice shall be male and without blemish. These animals shall be killed and washed and burned so each shall smoke on the altar in the Tent of Appointed Meeting. This will be for an ascent offering, an offering made by fire in expression of compliance to God and to make atonement before God.

Raising A Child With Autism? Yes, There's An App For That

Raising a child with a disability is overwhelming. My daughter was three and a half when I finally received her Autism diagnosis, but she’d been in early intervention therapies since she was 8 months old. PT, OT, ST, ABA, AVB, etc.; we worked our way through the therapy alphabet.

Dani Gillman

I Stand By My Reasons, And I Try To Transcend Them

Excuse {\ik-ˈskyüs\}
Noun: A reason or explanation put forward to defend or justify a fault or offense.

Jacob Schorr and Lillian Schorr at the Pez Factory. Photo courtesy Rabbi Rebeca Schorr

Parents Feel Better By Helping Other Parents

With the summer approaching, many parents have spent the last few months planning activities for their children. Some families choose to send their children to camp or specialized programs. Finding appropriate activities can be especially difficult for parents of children recently diagnosed with any special need. Parents should not feel as though they are going through the process alone, however, because there are probably mothers and fathers in the community who are eager to help.

Frances Victory

5 Things You Can Say To The Parent Of A Child With Special Needs

As awareness grows regarding a number of disabilities, such as autism and sensory processing disorder, people are talking. Often, they’re talking to the parents who are raising children who struggle with these issues, and they’re offering comments such as, "I don’t know how you do it." 

Although well-intentioned, those comments aren’t always well-received.

Joanna Dreifus

A Jewish Parent’s Power Toolbox for Helping Kids Cope with Terror In The News

07/23/2012 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

It was a tough week on the news ticker for parents.  First came the heinous attack on an Israeli tour bus in Bulgaria, followed only days later by the incomprehensible tragedy in Colorado. Questions of how to talk to our children about these headlines have weighed heavily ever since.

Sharon Duke Estroff

That's Why They Call It The Bubble

I just got back from Israel. I went as a kind of pre-state pilgrim, but the circumstances and the trappings of the trip were hardly old-fashioned, or pious. My ever-generous in-laws wanted to show off their grandchildren at a wedding thrown by olim relatives, so the grandchildren’s parents got to come along.

Bubbles are so beautiful

A Son Who Does Not Know How To Ask

04/09/2012 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

It began as the typical nightmare of so many parents, but concluded with an unsettling twist: Danny, age 3, had made his way through the door, down to the building’s lobby and out onto the lively sidewalks of Manhattan. By the time Hannah Brown found her son, in a shop near her Upper West Side building, she was beside herself. But Danny? He registered no concern.

Elicia Brown

The Promise Of Parenting Portals

When it comes to reaching unaffiliated Jewish parents of young kids, hip and attractive web portals aren’t just a good idea. They actually seem to work.

That’s the take-away from two recent reports: an evaluation of Denver’s MazelTot and an “audience profile & satisfaction survey” for Kveller, the New York-based (but national) Jewish parenting blog.

This Land Is Your Land?

06/06/2011 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

My long-legged 9-year-old clambers onto my lap, her eye-rolling cynicism suppressed for the moment. Together we wait, staring at the computer screen’s still image of an Israeli flag, listening as the sentimental strains of a symphony rise up. But when a disembodied voice explodes in song, Talia joins in, belting out the Hebrew words with a gusto she usually reserves for Broadway show tunes, her torso swaying from the effort. My daughter is caught up in the love and hope and dreams of “Hatikvah.”

Elicia Brown
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