parenting

A Son Who Does Not Know How To Ask

04/10/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

It began as the typical nightmare of so many parents, but concluded with an unsettling twist: Danny, age 3, had made his way through the door, down to the building’s lobby and out onto the lively sidewalks of Manhattan. By the time Hannah Brown found her son, in a shop near her Upper West Side building, she was beside herself. But Danny? He registered no concern.

Elicia Brown

The Promise Of Parenting Portals

When it comes to reaching unaffiliated Jewish parents of young kids, hip and attractive web portals aren’t just a good idea. They actually seem to work.

That’s the take-away from two recent reports: an evaluation of Denver’s MazelTot and an “audience profile & satisfaction survey” for Kveller, the New York-based (but national) Jewish parenting blog.

This Land Is Your Land?

06/07/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

My long-legged 9-year-old clambers onto my lap, her eye-rolling cynicism suppressed for the moment. Together we wait, staring at the computer screen’s still image of an Israeli flag, listening as the sentimental strains of a symphony rise up. But when a disembodied voice explodes in song, Talia joins in, belting out the Hebrew words with a gusto she usually reserves for Broadway show tunes, her torso swaying from the effort. My daughter is caught up in the love and hope and dreams of “Hatikvah.”

Elicia Brown

When Readiness Chooses You

02/18/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

My ten-year old daughter Sophie paid homage to my recent birthday with the best-worst birthday toast I could imagine: “Happy Birthday to the world’s greatest mom – and to the world’s best grandma one day!”

Deborah Grayson Riegel

The Battle Hymn of the Jewish Mother

01/21/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

How dare she. How dare a mother deny her children playdates, television and even bathroom breaks until they had mastered their musical instruments. What kind of mom-ster does this?

Deborah Grayson Riegel

Planned (Single) Parenthood

Single mothers bridge the world of play dates and real dates. It can be an emotional balancing act.

Special To The Jewish Week
12/07/2010

It is a brisk afternoon in early November, and Faith Tomases has dressed accordingly, moving stiffly beneath layers of warmth, her long chestnut hair swept beneath a black beret. But watching Tomases’ daughter Julia, one would expect an entirely different climate.

Faith Tomases and daughter Julia. “You should really get married,” the 8-year-old informs her mom. photos by michael datikash

To Yeshiva or Not, That is the Question

11/02/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Eleven years ago, when I got married- all heady from wedding gown fittings, arguments with the photographer and the fact my husband, a very secular Jew, agreed to celebrate our union in a most Orthodox, Jewish way -- the word “yeshiva” would not have been a blip on my radar screen.

If you had asked me whether or not I’d be inclined to send my kids to yeshiva, a haughty cackle would have emanated from deep in my throat: “no, are you crazy?”

Melissa Chapman

Birth Announcement For Kveller

 A week and a half ago I mentioned here that Kveller, a new Jewish parenting website was due to arrive this fall.

Well, I am pleased to see that it seems to have emerged from the womb sometime last week. While I am not privy to the labor-and-delivery details (Ob-gyn or midwife? Natural or C-section?), from what I can see the newborn is attractive and in good health — and, with hundreds of articles and listings, already has a lot to say.

The Perfectionist’s Dilemma: When is Good Enough Good Enough?

06/25/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

I wanted my newborn twins’ homecoming to be perfect. But four days after Jacob and Sophie were born, my husband Michael and I were permitted to bring our robust seven-pound son home while our daughter, a dainty four pounds, had to stay in the NICU for a few more days. With one baby in arms and one left behind, our return home was far from perfect. I would quickly learn, however, when perfection would be critical -- and when good enough was good enough.

Deborah Grayson Riegel
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