A Chupah For Chelsea?
07/20/10
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The July 31 nuptials of former first daughter Chelsea Clinton and her Jewish fiancé, Marc Mezvinsky, are fast approaching, and much about the event remains a closely guarded secret.

While most Americans are eager for details about the dress, the guest list and the location (which almost everyone agrees now is Astor Court in upstate Rhinebeck), for Jews the big question remains: will it be a Jewish wedding? 

While WCBS-TV reported last weekend that “the menu will be kosher,” it cited no sources. And no word yet about whether there will be a rabbi, a chupah or any religious rituals, Christian or Jewish, at the ceremony.

The wedding begins at 7:30 p.m. on a Saturday, however, more than an hour before the end of Shabbat. The timing (along with the bride being gentile) narrows the pool of available rabbis, since many rabbis who officiate at interfaith weddings will not do so on the Sabbath.

As with many weddings, guests have been asked to make special special dietary requests known in advance. The report about kosher food came as a surprise to some because the invitation is said to have contained no Hebrew or any Jewish references.

Beyond the wedding, the long-term religious plans of the couple are also shrouded in mystery. The groom, who is the son of two former members of Congress, was raised in a Conservative Jewish family; Clinton is Methodist. They attended Yom Kippur services together last year at Manhattan’s Jewish Theological Seminary. No word yet on whether anyone plans to convert, in what faith (if any) they will raise future children; it is quite possible, in fact that the couple, like many other interfaith couples, remains undecided.

It’s not just Jews speculating about the religious details of the interfaith wedding of the century: articles have appeared in the Associated Press, Babble (a parenting Web site) and AOL’s Politics Daily blog (which included a quote from yours truly) using the wedding as a jumping-off point for larger discussions of intermarriage. 

 

Last Update:

09/15/2010 - 14:32

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Here is what I cannot figure out - why anonymous commenters trolling this site care enough to make negative factually incorrect, gramatically poor comments full of spelling mistakes about something they claim no one should care about... Please realize that you do not have a monopoly on the truth... Seriously, though, following celebrities no doubt has its evolutionary reasons, and is usually pretty harmless. There is a wonderful aspect here, though. We live in an era and a country where individuals, even of prominent station, choosing their mates, give "to bigotry no sanction". Let us not take this for granted. The alternative is 75 years ago, when there was not much intermarriage, because, no one wanted to marry a Jew! Now, if you'll excuse me, I need to get back to more productive things, like getting an update on how Lindsay is doing in jail...
Now that Lindsey is a free (so to speak) woman, we can continue to focus on Mel Gibson, who is now wearing a disguise.
do you thin k for orthodox jews or for jews it looks goold to have a rabbi offficiate at a wedding that starts on shabbos.let her father marry her as he did weiner and enough speculation.
Marc's mother is Jewish - her name is Marjorie Margolis.
Some day I'll figure out why this is so important to the outside world. Why can't some things just be private and not become public in every magazine, every newspaper, every TV "NEWS" program, etc.? What makes people want to know all about everyone's private lives............ G-d bless sensationalism! Can't believe the Jewish Week felt a need to cover this in all aspects.......
It's none of my business what another Jew decides to do as far as his interfaith marriage. And yet... When a Jewish person is a figure of prominence, their choice to a) marry outside the faith, b) have a wedding on Shabbat, and c) have a non-Jewish wedding (in ritual), leads too many to see Judaism as disposable by those born into it. Is it? Too many of us have not received the foundation in our Judaism, it seems, to ward off falling into these breaks from belief and tradition. I didn’t get it when a date in high school told me that she didn’t date non-Jews because it might turn serious, and she would never marry a non-Jew. It took me a few years until it became clear. And what I did not get from my parents (although I did get a deep love of Judaism) will be given to my children. Jewish is who you are, and you do everything possible to keep it that way and make sure it is who your children are as well.
I agree. Unfortunately, too many Jews do not have an adequate background in Judaism. Judaism is a very rich religion filled with wonderful insights in how to live one's life. Not a shabbas goes by that I do not learn something meaningful about life. I believe the reason many Jews choose to intermarry is because neither partner knows enough about their religion to make them want to cling to their faith.
Ms. Wiener: What is the basisof your statement "for Jews the big question remains: will it be a Jewish wedding?" A poll, anectodal evidence, social page gossip? I think you'll find, for most Jews, as for most Americans as a whole, there is no question, only a big "Who cares".
The biggest question is, with no public prospect of conversion (unlike, say Ivanka Trump Kushner), why is the Jewish Week wasting time on this story? Intermarriages are hardly news, and the rest of the reportage is fodder for Page SIX, People Magazine, or worse. Those of us who care about such things can only sigh, sadly, and turn the page.
There are news reports that groom's mother is NOT Jewish in which case this will NOT be an intermarriage but simply the marriage of two gentiles.
The groom's mother is indeed Jewish. Her name is Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky. She is divorced from the groom's father.

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