Hungarians Protest Against Anti-Semitism
06/08/12
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About 120 Hungarians donned paper yellow stars with the word “Jude” (“Jew” in German) written on them and lined up on the bank of the Danube in downtown Budapest to protest recent anti-Semitic and racist incidents in Hungary.

Local media said the demonstration Thursday afternoon was a Flashmob organized on Facebook.

The protesters staged the demonstration outside the building hosting the offices of Members of Parliament.

The state news agency MTI said several demonstrators told its correspondent that even though the Hungarian government had stated that it intends to protect Jewish Hungarians, concrete steps, rather than words, were needed.

One example, they were quoted as saying, would be for the government to back down on including openly anti-Semitic authors in the national school curriculum.

Earlier this week, the government pledged action after an unknown man swore at an elderly retired Chief Rabbi and shouted that he hated "all Jews," saying it would do "everything in its power to combat words and actions which are incompatible with European norms.

Last Update:

06/12/2012 - 19:31

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I often write about the uniqueness of the Holocaust and state that the Holocaust is completely different from other Genocides. This position is controversial to some people. There are those who believe that the only way to preserve the memory of the Holocaust is by making it a universal lesson regarding the tribulations throughout the world. Whether I am right or wrong, only our children, grandchildren and great grandchildren will know. Seventy five years from when the last of the holocaust survivors are gone I predict that regardless of Yad Vashem, the United States Holocaust Museum, and all the other museums and books, the memory of the Holocaust will not be preserved. It will be regarded as just another Genocide in the history of genocides.
Unless we preserve the memory of the Holocaust and tie it to Jewish observance and ritual by including the Holocaust in prayer service or as I have done, creating a Holocaust Siddur and Haggadah (which is available free on line: holocausthaggadah.com) the Holocaust will become a mere date in history. It has to be tied into a revitalized Judaism to keep it alive.I for one, at this point in my life, no longer stress the pain, suffering and horrors of the Holocaust. Today I speak of the importance of learning about the heroic individuals who survived the Holocaust to make better lives for themselves and their families. Many Holocaust survivors have created synagogues, yeshivot and day schools and still support them financially. We need to learn about those who resisted the Nazis, not only about the crematoriums. The memory of the Holocaust will be kept alive by future generations if we have pride in the accomplishments of the survivors and preserve Judaism. Rabbi Dr. Bernhard Rosenberg

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